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Journal article

Wish you were here?

Author:
CALLEN Ian
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, July 2011, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

For people with learning disabilities, being able to choose where they go on holiday, and what they do there, is fundamentally important. This article discusses the importance of choice, and describes the work of a project in southern France, Go Provence Supported Holidays, offers people with learning disabilities genuine choice in their holidays and what they want to do when they are there.

Journal article

Dancing across the language barrier

Author:
SAMSON Sara
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 19(2), November 2005, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

A cultural exchange between the Brighton-based dance company High Spin and the French group L'Atelier de Jour de Ravelin revealed a contrasting approach by the two groups. The author discusses what they learnt from each other.

Journal article

Adapted physical activity programme and self-perception in obese adolescents with intellectual disability: between morphological awareness and positive illusory bias

Authors:
SALAUN Laureline, REYNES Eric, BERTHOUZE-ARANDA Sophie E.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 27(2), 2014, pp.112-124.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: In adolescent with intellectual disability, the management of obesity is a crucial issue, yet also quite complex because of their particular perception of themselves. This study investigated the relationship between self-perception variables and morphological variables and their changes after a 9-month Adapted Physical Activity (APA) programme. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three adolescents with intellectual disability responded to an adapted questionnaire, including the PSI-VSF-ID and a nine-drawing body silhouette scale. Anthropometric and body composition indicators were measured before and after the APA programme. Results: The main predictor of the adolescents' self-perceptions was the inclination towards positive illusory bias before the intervention; obesity awareness ranked second. Morphological measurements did not contribute in the same way to self-perceptions in the initial and final data. Conclusions: This study confirms the interest of weight management programmes for adolescents with intellectual disability and points to the need to take positive illusory bias more fully into account in the study of self-perception. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Decision-making after prenatal diagnosis of a syndrome predisposing to intellectual disability: what prospective parents need to know and the importance of non-medical information

Author:
HUYARD Caroline
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 37(4), December 2012, pp.315-323.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

A study conducted in France, Belgium and Germany investigated what type of information prospective parents need for decision-making about continuing or terminating a pregnancy in the case of a condition predisposing to intellectual disability. 33 parents whose young or adult children had an intellectual disability were recruited through self-help groups, and took part in semi-structured interviews covering discovery of the syndrome, parenting practices, moral feelings regarding the child's behaviour, and personal dimensions of the experience of having such a child. Data analysis focusing on decision-making highlighted the importance of 3 types of information: the foetus as a future child and individual person, the couple as future parents, and the social environment of the future child and his or her parents and its capacity to support them. The article discusses these categories of information in relation to the decisions the interviewees retrospectively considered they would have made had they known about their child's syndrome at a prenatal stage. It includes quotations from participants. The authors conclude that their findings demonstrate that prospective parents' essential information needs are not limited to medical information.

Book

Paid work and housing : a comparative guide to the impact of employment on housing and support for people with learning disabilities

Authors:
PANNELL Jenny, SIMONS Ken, MACADAM Margaret
Publisher:
Pavilion
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
77p.
Place of publication:
Brighton

This book compares the French and UK systems of providing related employment, support and housing for people with learning disabilities, focusing on and exploring the extent to which these systems facilitate opportunities to access work and housing. It identifies and describes a range of employment-related projects in the UK and France, exploring the strengths and weaknesses of both systems, and canvassing the opinions of those providing and, importantly, those using the services. The report makes recommendations for the future development of housing and employment options, suggesting ways in which these could include wider community involvement. With policy changes expected in this area in the UK, it aims to put the views of people with learning disabilities firmly on the agenda.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Journal article

Ageing and health status in adults with intellectual disabilities: results of the European Pomona II study

Authors:
HAVEMAN Meindert, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 36(1), March 2011, pp.49-60.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

POMONA II was a European Commission funded public health project collecting information from 14 countries using a set of key health indicators specifically relevant for people with intellectual disabilities. This research focused on age-specific differences relating to environmental and lifestyle factors and the 17 medical conditions measured by the POMONA Checklist of Health Indicators. The article describes how information was collected using the POMONA Health Interview Survey and Evaluation Form from a sample of 1,253 participants in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, and the United Kingdom. It then presents the results of the analysis, with tables showing characteristics of people with intellectual disabilities in the study, frequency of social contacts with relatives or friends according to age, lifestyle risk factors in people with intellectual disabilities according to age, and general and age-specific prevalence rates of health problems. The authors discuss how healthy older adults with intellectual disabilities are with regard to lifestyle factors, and whether there are health disparities between older adults with and without intellectual disabilities. They note that some evidence of health disparities was found for older people with intellectual disabilities, particularly in terms of under diagnosed or inadequately managed preventable health conditions.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Channel crossing

Author:
HUNTER Mark
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 16.09.04, 2004, pp.42-43.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on an Anglo-French partnership, between Medway Council and the Maison de l'Initiative in the Grande Synthe region, which is pioneering 'cultural mediation' as a way to combat exclusion among ethnic minorities. The project is funded until July 2005 by the European Union's Interreg IIIA programme. In Medway the project is focusing on improving access to social services for people from ethnic minorities with mental health needs, physical disabilities and learning difficulties. In France the mediators are targeting employment issues for ethnic minorities.

Book

Helping disabled people to work: a cross-national study of social security and employment provisions; a report for the Social Security Advisory Committee

Authors:
THORNTON Patricia, SAINSBURY Roy, BARNES Helen
Publisher:
Stationery Office/University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
164p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Research paper presenting a comparative study of the employment of disabled people, focusing in particular on the need to be flexible in terms of hours worked and breaks needed. Also looks at the disabling effects of many working environments.

Journal article

Relaxation therapy and anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation among adults with intellectual disabilities: a randomized controlled trial

Authors:
BOUVET Cyrille, COULET Aurelie
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 20(3), 2016, pp.228-240.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

This pilot study is a randomised controlled trial on the effects of relaxation on anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) working in a centre of supported employment in France. A total of 30 adults with mild or moderate ID who were split at random into a relaxation group (RG, 15 subjects), who completed 10 sessions of relaxation therapy, and a control group (CG, 15 subjects), who were on a waiting list. The method used is the pretest and posttest. Variables were assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory form Y scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. We found that in the RG, relaxation significantly reduced state anxiety, improved self-esteem and cognitive reappraisal, while the CG showed no change for these variables. The authors conclude that relaxation seems to be an interesting therapeutic option for reducing anxiety in people with ID in a supported employment setting. (Edited publisher abstract)

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