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Journal article

Eliciting proto-imperatives and proto-declaratives in children with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
VANDEREET Joke, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 23(2), March 2010, pp.154-166.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Whilst structured elicitation tasks are known to be efficient means to sample communication in children with intellectual disabilities, their validity and reliability require evaluation. The aims of this study were: to evaluate the eliciting potential; to examine the utterance forms of proto-imperative and proto-declarative intentions; and to evaluate the reliability of two high-structured elicitation tasks. Twenty-eight children with intellectual disabilities (all having severe problems acquiring symbolic language skills) participated in a standard assessment battery, consisting of a formal language assessment, a parent questionnaire, and elicitation tasks for both proto-imperatives proto-declaratives. These tasks elicited significantly more proto-imperatives than proto-declaratives, with proto-imperatives being predominantly expressed with gestures and proto-declaratives predominantly with vocalisations. Medium to large correlations were found between the elicitation tasks and the other communication and language instruments. The authors concluded that while several factors need to be considered to account for the observed differences in frequency and utterance forms of the elicited proto-imperatives versus proto-declaratives, nevertheless, the overall results suggest that the elicitation tasks for proto-imperatives and proto-declaratives can be reliably used in children with intellectual disabilities.

Journal article

Place in Europe

Author:
HOPKINS Graham
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 27.01.05, 2005, pp.46-47.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Phil Madden, Director of service development at the Home Farm Trust, describes the organisations involvement in a one year project 'Families In' funded by the European Commission. The project involved partners from Sweden, Finland, Spain, Belgium and Hungary. He describes the challenges and rewards of the project.

Journal article

Decision-making after prenatal diagnosis of a syndrome predisposing to intellectual disability: what prospective parents need to know and the importance of non-medical information

Author:
HUYARD Caroline
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 37(4), December 2012, pp.315-323.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

A study conducted in France, Belgium and Germany investigated what type of information prospective parents need for decision-making about continuing or terminating a pregnancy in the case of a condition predisposing to intellectual disability. 33 parents whose young or adult children had an intellectual disability were recruited through self-help groups, and took part in semi-structured interviews covering discovery of the syndrome, parenting practices, moral feelings regarding the child's behaviour, and personal dimensions of the experience of having such a child. Data analysis focusing on decision-making highlighted the importance of 3 types of information: the foetus as a future child and individual person, the couple as future parents, and the social environment of the future child and his or her parents and its capacity to support them. The article discusses these categories of information in relation to the decisions the interviewees retrospectively considered they would have made had they known about their child's syndrome at a prenatal stage. It includes quotations from participants. The authors conclude that their findings demonstrate that prospective parents' essential information needs are not limited to medical information.

Journal article

'I need help on Mondays, it's not my day. The other days, I'm OK'. Perspectives of disabled children on inclusive education

Authors:
de SCHAUWER Elisabeth, et al
Journal article citation:
Children and Society, 23(2), March 2009, pp.99-111.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article examines the experience of inclusive education from the perspective of disabled children. The study uses observations of, and interviews with, 15 children, aged 5–17 who go to a mainstream school. The study is set in the context of a 3-year research project exploring the practice of inclusive education in Flanders. The authors report on the key findings from the children's accounts, focusing on what they had to say about themselves, what they think about school, friends, support and their future prospects.

Journal article

Program development of reminiscence group work for ageing people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
VAN PUYENBROECK Joris, MEAS Bea
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 31(3), September 2006, pp.139-147.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

The goal of this study was to adapt a narrative reminiscence program for the special needs of ageing people with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities. Research has shown that stimulating reminiscence in the elderly can be a meaningful activity, and holds promise for positive effects on well-being. In the first stage (10 weeks), the program was developed with 1 group. Evaluation and adjustments to the program were made based on video recordings, the researcher's log, and feedback from participants and support workers. Formative evaluation was performed by means of a within group analysis. In the second stage (3 weeks), the program was introduced to 6 other groups. Interviews with professional support workers were subjected to a cross-case analysis. The final program consists of 13 sessions covering different reminiscence themes. The success of reminiscence group work relies on (a) well-prepared and structured sessions, (b) adequate use of visual triggers, and (c) facilitating, coaching and moderating. The program was perceived as a valuable and meaningful activity by all participants. Although reminiscence group work is not therapeutic in nature, it may have therapeutic use for ageing people with intellectual disabilities, and in this sense is worth evaluating.

Journal article

Partnership working between university researchers and self-advocacy organizations; 'a way forward for inclusion?’ in England and ‘Fine feathers make a fine bird’ in Flanders

Authors:
SCHOETERS Ludo, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 9(4), December 2005, pp.345-357.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

This article gives accounts of differing experiences of self-advocate partnerships in research with universities in England and Flanders. In England the partnership grew up within a local People First group built upon a personal working relationship with one support person. It is focused almost exclusively on empirical research and, because it is aimed at influencing policy and practice, questions of funding and control are to the fore. In Flanders the partnership is closely linked with the development of a national movement of self-advocates in which the university was a close ally. Research is important in both contexts but in Flanders the university is more clearly identified with the wider movement. Partnerships have their ups and downs but in both countries researchers with the label ‘learning difficulties’ wish to set their own agendas and place great importance on trust in their work with their support worker (England) or ally (Flanders).

Journal article

Modern times: an ethnographic study on the quality of life of people with a high support need in a Flemish residential facility

Authors:
de WAELE Isabel, Van HOVE Geert
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 20(6), October 2005, pp.625-639.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This ethnographic study shows the impact of the care system on clients’ and staff’s life experiences, with the clear distance between these two groups as one of the core issues. Together with a dominant care approach and a well established but subtile system of control, it makes them function in systems that are characterized by an oppressing care culture. Learned helplessness prevents both groups of acting upon quality of life outcomes. The idea of supporting a life of good quality through merely improving these traditional care systems should therefore be considered with caution, and real alternatives should be considered to open this barrier of the oppressing care culture.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Journal article

'I never thought I would have to do this’: narrative study with siblings-in-law who live together with a family member with a disability

Authors:
VANHOUTTEGHEM Inge, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 42(4), 2014, pp.315-322.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Using narrative research, the authors have aimed to gain an insight into the perspectives of 14 siblings-in-law (living in the Flemish part of Belgium) about the decision to live together with a family member who has a learning disability. The decision to live together usually begins with a crisis. However, the decision process is a complex mechanism; it involves dynamics and events within a family (between family members both with and without blood relationships) and is intensified by experiences within a society that holds different views about families and disability. To develop a deeper understanding of this complex process the article considers interpretations based on the contextual framework of Boszormenyi-Nagy. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Additional support for individuals with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviors in regions of northwest Europe

Authors:
LUNENBORG Carolien B., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 8(2), June 2011, pp.92-103.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

About 10% of individuals with intellectual disability (ID) exhibit challenging behaviours. To support parents and care staff when they are unable to find a solution to overcome or reduce these behaviours, some countries provide additional professional support. In the Netherlands, 5 regional Centres for Consultation and Expertise (CCEs) offer supplemental support as part of their consultation programme. This study was undertaken to determine if additional professional support occurs in other regions of northwestern Europe and, if so, how was is organised. The regions which were looked at were Norway, Flanders, England, Wales, and the German regions of the Rhineland. Key informants in each region completed questionnaires about additional support services. The findings showed a diversity of approaches addressing additional support services. In most regions, there is no general formal policy on providing such support for individuals with ID, their parents, or care staff. Instead, either a range of local initiatives have been developed or there are no initiatives. In these instances, persons with ID or their carers have to rely on regular support services to address their mental health needs. The article concludes that organising additional support as part of a formal services will increase the likelihood that, when regular support has failed, individuals with ID or their carers will be able to obtain supports to find solutions for reducing problematic challenging behaviours.

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