Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 267

Journal article

Psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities: a review of effectiveness research

Authors:
PROUT H. Thompson, BROWNING Brooke K.
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 5(5), 2011, pp.53-59.
Publisher:
Emerald

This review aims to provide an update on the effectiveness of psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities. It summarises the conclusions of other reviews published in the last ten years, including a recent review by the authors. There is evidence that psychotherapy with persons with intellectual disabilities is at least moderately effective. There is also evidence of effectiveness of psychotherapy across child and adolescent and adult age groups. A range of therapeutic interventions are effective and a spectrum of problems can be addressed via psychotherapy. However the authors found relatively little relevant research literature and noted a lack of methodologically sound and rigorous studies. They suggest there is a need for well-designed studies, particularly randomised controlled trials, better specification of treatments (e.g. manualised), better outcome measures, and clearer specification of diagnostic categories within the intellectual disability population.

Journal article

The content of available practice literature in dementia and intellectual disability

Author:
JOKINEN Nancy
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 4(3), August 2005, pp.327-339.
Publisher:
Sage

Adults with intellectual disability are living to ages seen within the general population and they, too, are at risk of developing dementia. This review identifies the nature and content of the literature related to adults with intellectual disability and dementia and bring together guidelines for services and staff providing care. The preponderance of work between 1995 and 2004 focuses on the biomedical, diagnosis and assessment aspects of the disease. Although guidelines exist, there is a lack of published literature on the efficacy of practice strategies to guide the provision of daily care. Future research is discussed that could support continued community living and high quality of life during all stages of the disease.

Journal article

A guide to information sources in mental handicap

Author:
BEL-PAJOOH Ahmad
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 3(1), 1990, pp.89-94.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

A brief guide to information sources - periodicals, bibliographies and reference books, abstracts, indexes, dictionaries and general texts.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The importance of romantic love to people with learning disabilities

Authors:
BATES Claire, TERRY Louise, POPPLE Keith
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 45(1), 2017, pp.64-72.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Love is important aspect of life, including to people with learning disabilities both historically and more recently. Participants value the companionship, support and social status associated with a partner. Relationships are considered mechanisms to meet certain needs including feeling loved, company, intimacy and enabling individuals to marry and have children. This article examines the importance of romantic love to people with learning disabilities. Methods: A hermeneutic phenomenological study, guided by the theory of Van Manen was conducted using interviews with eleven people with learning disabilities examining the importance of romantic love. Results: The analysis revealed that love was important to them, specifically the companionship and support a loving partner provided. The physical expression of love by a partner was valued highly, especially kissing and cuddling. Most participants had experienced some form of abuse, but it appeared that the love of a partner was reparative and they were able to form satisfying relationships. Conclusion: Participants’ narratives highlighted the role staff play in supporting them to fulfill their romantic needs. The romantic relationship needs of people with learning disabilities were examined in relation to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. The hierarchy was revised to reflect the value of having a loving relationship to people with learning disabilities and to identify the support they required to facilitate and maintain this. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Personality disorder and intellectual disability: concept and prevalence

Author:
ANDERSEN Hilde Katrine
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 9(4), 2015, pp.163-173.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The range of prevalence of personality disorder (PD) found in people with intellectual disability (ID) has been reported as vast, and has included data from dissimilar settings. The purpose of this paper is to review the reported prevalence of PD in the general population of people with ID, and to consider how different and changing ideas about PD have affected these rates. Design/methodology/approach: Cross-sectional studies of the prevalence of PD in people with ID were identified. The quality of the studies was considered, along with how cases of PD were identified. Findings: Six studies were included. The reported prevalence of PD in people known to have ID ranged from 0.7 to 35 per cent. Possible reasons for this wide range included different views of PD and methods of assessment. Research limitations/implications: The wide range of findings suggests that methodological differences are significant. Consideration to how clinicians should respond to the overlap of impairment between ID and PD may improve the conceptual clarity of PD, informing future epidemiological research. Originality/value: This review was limited to studies of samples likely to be representative of the general ID population. The range of prevalence estimates was narrower than previously reported, and more likely to reflect the true prevalence rate of PD amongst people who have ID. Consideration was also given to how different ideas of PD led to different methods and may have contributed to variance in the results. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Criterion-related validity of challenging behaviour scales: a review of evidence in the literature

Authors:
TURTON Raistrick W., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 28(2), 2015, pp.81-98.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Behaviour that challenges has negative impacts on physical and emotional well-being and quality of life. Challenging behaviour scales are used to identify needs and evaluate interventions and must be valid measures. Criterion-related validity is important, and the best quality assessment uses direct measures of behaviour as criteria. Previous reviews of scales affirm their validity but present little supporting evidence. The current review examines the evidence presented in studies of validity. Methods: Searches of MEDLINE and PsycINFO to identify scales that focus on challenging behaviour and find publications that assess their criterion-related validity. Results: Searches identified twelve scales and 21 publications that assess validity. One assessment used direct measures of behaviour, and the remainder used indirect measures that themselves have limited evidence of validity, including membership of diagnostic or service groups and other scales. Conclusions: Little firm evidence of validity was found, but what was found is encouraging. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Supporting primary healthcare professionals to care for people with intellectual disability: a research agenda

Authors:
LENNOX Nicholas, van DRIEL Mieke L., van DOOREN Kate
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 28(1), 2015, pp.33-42.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: People with intellectual disability experience health inequalities. Over two decades after the only review of supports for primary healthcare providers was published, this paper contributes to an evolving research agenda that aims to make meaningful gains in health-related outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities. Methods: The authors update a previous review existing review by searching the international literature for developments and evaluations of multinational models of care. Results: Based on the review, three strategies are presented to support primary healthcare providers: (i) effectively using what we know, (ii) considering other strategies that offer support to primary healthcare professionals and (iii) researching primary health care at the system level. Conclusions: Strengthening primary care by supporting equitable provision of health-related care for people with intellectual disability is a much needed step towards improving health outcomes among people with intellectual disability. More descriptive quantitative and qualitative research, as well as intervention-based research underpinned by rigorous mixed-methods evaluating these strategies at the primary care level, which is sensitive to the needs of people with intellectual disability will assist primary care providers to provide better care and achieve better health outcomes. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Positive group psychotherapy modified for adults with intellectual disabilities

Author:
TOMASULO Daniel J
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 18(4), 2014, pp.337-350.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Mental health problems are more prevalent among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. There is mounting evidence to show that adults with a dual diagnosis can find help through group therapy and have more productive and meaningful lives with improved relationships. This article focuses on a review of evidence for interactive behavioural therapy, a widely used model of group psychotherapy for people with intellectual disabilities and mental health problems, and reviews the modifications drawn from the field of positive psychology and positive psychotherapy being incorporated into the model. A sample of a modified positive intervention, the virtual gratitude visit, is explained and suggestions for future research are given. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Experiences of people with learning disabilities in the criminal justice system

Authors:
HYUN Elly, HAHN Lyndsey, McCONNELL David
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 42(4), 2014, pp.308-314.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The aim of this review is to synthesise findings from research about the experiences of people with learning disabilities who have faced arrest and jail time. After an extensive search of the literature, four relevant articles were found. The first-person accounts presented in these four studies were pooled, and a thematic analysis was undertaken. Three common themes were identified: (i) study participants did not understand what was happening to them, or why, (ii) they felt alone, and they did not know where to turn, or to whom for support and (iii) they were uncertain about what to say or do. Overall, the findings raise concerns about the treatment of people with learning disabilities in the criminal justice system and their access to procedural justice. Further research is needed to improve understanding of their experiences and support needs. There is unequivocal evidence that persons with learning disabilities are over-represented in the prison population. To date however, few studies have investigated their first-hand experience, including their experiences of being interrogated, of standing trial, serving time and transitioning back into the community. The purpose of this review is to draw what insights we can from the limited available data and to identify directions for future research. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Health disparities of adults with intellectual disabilities: what do we know? What do we do?

Authors:
KRAHN Gloria L., FOX Michael H.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 27(5), 2014, pp.431-446.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: Building on historical context, the paper summarises what is known about health disparities from reports and research and provides direction on what to do to reduce these disparities among adults with intellectual disabilities. Methods: The present authors examined literature from 2002 to 2011 on health disparities and people with disabilities looking for broad themes on documenting disparities and on research approaches and methods. Results: Multiple countries published reports on health of people with intellectual disabilities. Researchers summarized existing research within a health disparities framework. A number of promising methodologies are identified such as health services research, health indicators, enhanced surveillance and mixed-methods. Conclusions: Strategies to reduce health disparities include use of data to educate decision makers, attention to social determinants and a life-course model and emphasis on leveraging inclusion in mainstream services where possible. (Edited publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts