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Book

Making connections: reflecting on the lives and experiences of people with learning difficulties; a reader

Editors:
BRECHIN Ann, WALMSLEY Jan
Publisher:
Hodder & Stoughton
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
289p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

A collection of readings exploring the experiences of people with learning difficulties, reflecting a variety of approaches from an individual to a social level.

Journal article

Commentary on “Enabling access to information by people with learning disabilities”

Author:
WALMSLEY Jan
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 18(1), 2013, pp.16-19.
Publisher:
Emerald

The author offers a commentary on Oldreive and Waight's article (Ibid p.5) on enabling access to information by people with learning disabilities. The article reflects on the issues raised by this paper, drawing on 25 years' experience and research and concludes that accessible information needs to be tailored to the individual and part of a wider approach to improving access. As the original paper states, formats for information provision need to be tailored to individual abilities and practitioners should not rely on “easy read”. The author notes that it is unlikely that any technology will replace support from skilled people and provides a reminder that translating information does not equate to inclusion.

Book

People with intellectual disabilities: towards a good life?

Authors:
JOHNSON Kelley, WALMSLEY Jan, WOLFE Marie
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
234p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

This book asks the following questions: what does it mean to live a good life; why has it proved so difficult for people with intellectual disabilities to live one; and what happens when we make a good life the centre of our consideration of people with intellectual disabilities. These questions are explored through a re-examination of ideas from philosophy and social theory, and through personal life stories. This book provides an analysis and critique of current policies and underpinning ideologies in relation to people with intellectual disabilities and explores ways in which a good life may be made more attainable. Chapters include: exploring a good life; part one: reflecting on a good life: my own life: Marie Wolfe; thinking about a good life; a good life and people with intellectual disabilities; part two: re-examining key concepts in the light of current practice: a good life in policy?; changing problems changing solutions; changing constructions of work; part three: rethinking a good life: justice, rights and capabilities; community, inclusion and belonging; promoting a good life; conclusion.

Journal article

Inclusive learning disability research: the (nondisabled) researcher's role

Author:
WALMSLEY Jan
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 32(2), June 2004, pp.65-71.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Explores the role of the nondisabled researcher who supports inclusive research in learning disability. Argues for more transparency about the role in order to highlight the challenges of working inclusively on research projects, the real contribution of people with learning difficulties to research, and the training/support implications of working inclusively.

Journal article

The development of community care for people with learning disabilities 1913 - 1946

Authors:
WALMSLEY Jan, ROLPH Sheena
Journal article citation:
Critical Social Policy, 21(1), February 2001, pp.59-80.
Publisher:
Sage

This article explores from an historical perspective the emerging debates on the similarities and differences between community care and institutional care. While institutional care has been widely condemned, community care has been welcomed as offering greater opportunities for adults who have long term care needs. The article argues, however, that it is more helpful to regard institutional and community care as a continuum, and draw on ongoing research into the history of community care for people with learning difficulties to show that community care has a longer history than has widely been assumed, and that some forms of community care were as much motivated by a desire to control as they were by a wish to provide care. The article ends with some consideration of the relevance of such historical studies for modern understandings of community care.

Journal article

Using autobiographical approaches with people with learning difficulties

Authors:
ATKINSON Dorothy, WALMSLEY Jan
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 14(2), March 1999, pp.203-216.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Biography and autobiography have been used in numerous ways to represent people with learning difficulties. This article reviews a variety of approaches to biography and autobiography with people with learning difficulties, and discusses the roles researchers play. Ends with a discussion of the potential of autobiography as a means to change the power relationships in disability research.

Journal article

Helping ourselves

Author:
WALMSLEY Jan
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 1.6.95, 1995, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on Equal People, a course produced by the Open University in partnership with Mencap and People First. The course is unique in that it is open to everyone, including people with learning difficulties. Describes the aims of the course.

Journal article

An investigation into the implementation of Annual Health Checks for people with intellectual disabilities

Author:
WALMSLEY Jan
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 15(3), September 2011, pp.157-166.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

People with intellectual disabilities are amongst the most disadvantaged groups in terms of health outcomes. To counteract this, regular screening of people with intellectual disabilities was introduced in 2008, with general practitioner (GP) practices financially incentivised to offer these Annual Health Checks (AHCs). Uptake of the health checks has been variable, with a national average of 41%. The aim of this project was to investigate the implementation of AHCs for people with intellectual disabilities in Oxfordshire, where only 26.1% of AHCs were completed in 2009–10. Visits were conducted to 6 GP practices where GPs had attended the AHC training and interviews were conducted with GPs who undertook health checks. In addition, the perspectives of people with intellectual disabilities were obtained through work with the ‘My Life My Choice’ self-advocacy group. This study found that slow progress in implementing AHCs was attributable to: uncertainty over who was eligible; limited awareness in general practices about the legal duty to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to facilitate access; limited awareness of AHCs and their potential benefits amongst carers and adults with intellectual disabilities; and in some cases scepticism that AHCs were either necessary or beneficial. The article also explores the benefits of undertaking this project in partnership with a self-advocacy group.

Book

Community care in perspective: care, control and citizenship

Editors:
WELSHMAN John, WALMSLEY Jan, (eds.)
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
278p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Basingstoke

The book fills a major gap in medical and social history by offering a detailed account of community provision for so called "vulnerable adults", from 1948 in the UK. The book focuses primarily on people with learning difficulties, but offers insights into community care more broadly, particularly through the use of key themes. The book has a contemporary relevance to aspiring and existing practitioners in health and social care because although historical lessons do not provide any kind of blueprint for the future, an understanding of the evolution of community care is of practical help to policy makers and service providers in offering a context for their work.

Journal article

Adulthood and people with mental handicaps: report of a research project

Author:
WALMSLEY Jan
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 4(2), 1991, pp.141-154.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Describes a small project which used research interviews to discover the meaning of adulthood to the research participants, five adults with mental handicaps. The project set out to design a research process which would respect their status as adults. The paper focuses on the research process, and the merits and difficulties of the approach are discussed in the context of research methodologies which emphasise the need to redress the power imbalance inherent in more traditional methods.

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