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Journal article Full text available online for free

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Authors:
McINTOSH Barbara, SANDERSON Helen
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 20.04.06, 2006, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

This article reviews the findings of a major evaluation of person-centred planning for people with learning difficulties. The research, funded by the Department of Health, shows that person-centred planning has led to significant changes in the areas of social networks, contact with family, contact with friends, community-based activities, scheduled day activities, and levels of choice.

Journal article

Putting the person at the centre of planning

Authors:
ROUTLEDGE Martin, SANDERSON Helen
Journal article citation:
Community Living, 14(2), October 2000, pp.17-18.
Publisher:
Hexagon Publishing

Person centred planning (PCP) is increasingly promoted as a means by which people with learning difficulties can explore and be supported to pursue the lives they wish to lead. The authors from the North West Training and Development Team report on a serious attempt to make PCP happen within a large learning disability service.

Book Full text available online for free

Person centred approaches in transition

Author:
SANDERSON Helen
Publisher:
Helen Sanderson Associates
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
11p.
Place of publication:
Stockport

Person centred approaches offer different ways of gathering information about children and young people in order to help to determine what is important to the person, what they want for their future, and what support they need. The aim of this paper is to describe a wide range of different person centred approaches, derived from different styles of person centred planning. The approaches are: personal portfolios; relationship circles; gifts; skills and interests; hopes and dreams; how to provide good support; communication chart; history; fears and nightmares; and how I spend my time. Information from these approaches can provide patterns and themes which could help point a way forward for transition.

Book Full text available online for free

Choice and control for all: the role of individual service funds in delivering fully personalised care and support

Authors:
SANDERSON Helen, et al
Publisher:
Groundswell
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
38p.
Place of publication:
London

The aim of this report is to consider the challenge of introducing personal budgets for everyone and to describe the important role that Individual Service Funds (ISFs) can play in making choice and control work for people with the most complex needs. ISFs are defined as all or part of a personal budget being held by a provider on an individual’s behalf. The money is restricted for use on that individual’s support and according to their wishes, and accounted for accordingly. This report describes: what ISFs are; the history of ISFs; their key features; how they developed; and the process of developing an ISF. Three different approaches to individualising services using ISFs are described and illustrated with case study examples of how each of these approaches has been used. The approaches are: partial disaggregation; micro commissioning; and full disaggregation. Also described is a step-by-step description of developing an ISF, beginning with an individual allocation of resources, followed by planning, agreement, implementation, on-going learning and regular review. The report argues that ISFs should be a key part of any local strategy for making personal budgets happen at scale.

Book Full text available online for free

Making it personal for everyone: from block contracts towards individual service funds

Authors:
SCOWN Steve, SANDERSON Helen
Publisher:
Dimensions
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
126p.
Place of publication:
Stockport

Dimensions is a not-for-profit organisation which supports people with learning disabilities and people with autism, including providing "traditional" care services such as residential care homes. In the context of the personalisation agenda, Dimensions considered how it could help people in traditional services take control of their funding and determine and control their own support. This book is designed to share learning about how the organisation changed its services and practice. It covers the testing of new approaches in an existing home for people with learning disabilities, financial aspects, personalisation and the person-centred approach, providing "just enough support", implementation, and impact on service users. It also reviews what the organisation learnt and top tips for other providers facing similar challenges.

Book

Top tips: how you can support people to plan

Authors:
SANDERSON Helen, MCSTRAVICK Suzanne
Publisher:
In Control
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
35p.
Place of publication:
London

Some people need support to decide their route through life. This booklet is aimed at family members, friends, advocates and paid workers of people who require support. It provides them with ideas to help them support the person to make a plan which enables them to live the life they want. The guide has 2 parts. Part 1, ‘Deciding Where To Go’ , discusses information that need to be considered before designing the plan, such as: what money is available for support; who can help make important decisions and put the plan together; understanding the person and what they enjoy doing; and keeping fit and healthy. Part 2, ‘Deciding How To Get There’, considers the support that is needed to enact the plan. It includes considering where the person wants to live and what housing choices are possible. It also advises writing out a timetable which sets out how the person will spend their time and filling in the times of paid and unpaid support.  Four different types of support that can be used are considered: specialist support providers; individual support providers; family and friends; and support that occurs naturally in the community. Employment of supporters, such as designing the person specification, job description and recruitment, are also considered.

Book

In the driving seat: a workbook to help me plan my support

Authors:
SANDERSON Helen, MCSTRAVICK Suzanne
Publisher:
In Control
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
24p.
Place of publication:
London

This guide is aimed at individuals who need support to help them make their own plan which enables them to live the life they want. It has 2 parts. Part 1, ‘Deciding Where To Go’, discusses information that needs to be considered before designing the plan, such as: what money is available; who can help make important decisions and put the plan together; what the person wants their life to be like and what they enjoy doing; and keeping fit and healthy. Part 2, ‘Getting There’, considers the support that is needed to enact the plan. It includes considering where the person want to live and spend time. It also includes consideration of who will provide support, what they should be like, what they should do, how they should be managed, and how much the support will cost.

Journal article

From a support plan to an Individual Service Fund

Authors:
SANDERSON Helen, et al
Journal article citation:
Community Connecting, 14, May 2008, pp.6-11.
Publisher:
Community Connecting

When someone wants to use their individual budget to buy supports from a provider, they are using an Individual Service Fund. This article looks at how a support plan can inform who the best people are to provide this support for the individual, what support staff need to be able to do, and what agreements are useful to have in place. The importance of person specifications, job descriptions and individual support agreement are highlighted. The article also includes suggested templates for a person specification template and a support workers job description are also included.

Book

Person centred practice for professionals

Editors:
THOMPSON Jeanette, KILBANE Jackie, SANDERSON Helen, (eds.)
Publisher:
Open University Press
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
316p.
Place of publication:
Maidenhead

This text offers a range of practical, person centred and evidence based approaches to tackling challenges faced by professionals working with people with learning disabilities. It helps the reader to analyze issues relating to person centred practice and citizenship and considers the implications of this key government initiative for health and social care professionals. The authors aim to support professionals in working through this changing agenda, whilst identifying the interface between their own professional practice and person centred approaches to working with people who have a learning disability. In addition, the book also: explores the historical context of learning disability services and how this has contributed to the development of person centred services; introduces a range of practical person centred thinking tools that can be readily used within professional practice; contains a model to inform the delivery and integration of person centred practice within professional practice; considers the contribution of a range of different professional roles to the person centred and self directed support approach; and finally evaluates the relevance of person centred thinking and planning to people from different cultural backgrounds and those undergoing the transition from adolescence to adulthood.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The emergence of person centred planning as evidence-based practice

Authors:
SANDERSON Helen, THOMPSON Jeanette, KILBANE Jackie
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 14(2), April 2006, pp.18-25.
Publisher:
Emerald

Recent research has demonstrated that person-centred planning leads to positive changes for people. This research shows how person centred planning is associated with benefits in the areas of community involvement, contact with friends, contact with family and choice. This paper briefly describes this research and its recommendations. In addition it explores the implications for managers and professional supporting people with learning disabilities. The research took place over two years in four localities in England.

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