Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 12

Journal article

A preliminary investigation of factors affecting employment motivation in people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
ANDREWS Abbye, ROSE John L.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 7(4), December 2010, pp.239-244.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Relatively small numbers of people with intellectual disabilities are engaging in paid employment and those who are tend to be working only part-time. This study aimed to address the question of what factors motivate people with intellectual disabilities to work. The issue was investigated in a sample of 10 young work-age adults attending supported learning courses at a further education college in England. The participants were asked directly about their feelings through 2 focus groups, each comprising 5 people. A set of questions with additional prompts was used to elicit responses, and cards and scales were used as visual aids. Participants were asked about what factors motivated them to work and what factors deterred them from working. Thematic analysis of the transcribed tapes revealed three major themes that affected participants' motivation to work: monetary gain, social aspects, and perceived competence. More detailed research is needed in order to validate these findings with a larger, more representative sample.

Journal article

Sexual offending theories and offenders with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
KEELING Jenny A., ROSE John L., BEECH Anthony R.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(5), September 2009, pp.468-476.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

A number of theories developed for mainstream sex offenders and their application to sexual offenders with an intellectual disability are discussed. Three levels of theory are discussed. These include multifactor theories, single-factor theories associated with socio-affective functioning and an offence process theory, the self-regulation model of relapse prevention. Finally, a recent theoretical development called the 'integrated theory of sexual offending' (ITSO) is discussed and applied to sexual offenders with intellectual disabilities. This theory combines theories from all three levels in an effort to provide a comprehensive explanation of the aetiology and maintenance of sexual offending.

Journal article

A preliminary evaluation of the adaptation of four assessments for offenders with special needs

Authors:
KEELING Jenny A., ROSE John L., BEECH Anthony R.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 32(2), June 2007, pp.62-73.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Appropriate assessment is an essential part of treating sexual offenders. Few assessments exist that can be used with offenders who have lower levels of intellectual functioning and/or literacy deficits. This study describes the adaptation of four self-report assessments for sexual offenders with special needs: (i) the Social Intimacy Scale; (ii) the Relationship Scales Questionnaire; (iii) the Criminal Sentiments Scale; and (iv) the Victim Empathy Distortion Scale. Each scale was adapted in an effort to simplify content and language and to improve readability. Preliminary data are presented on the comparability of each adapted measure to the original, as well as the internal consistency, reliability, and concurrent validity of the adapted tests. The SIS and the QVES were identified as appropriate assessment measures, comparable to the original with good reliability and validity. One subscale of the RSQ had fair reliability and validity, while the remaining subscales had varied psychometric properties. The adapted CSS had poor psychometric qualities and the adaptation of this test appears not to have been successful. The relevance of these findings to an understanding of offending by this population is discussed.

Journal article

Relapse prevention with intellectually disabled sexual offenders

Authors:
KEELING Jenny A., ROSE John L.
Journal article citation:
Sexual Abuse a Journal of Research and Treatment, 17(4), October 2005, pp.407-423.
Publisher:
Sage

This paper discusses the sexual offending characteristics and pathways of intellectually disabled sexual offenders. From a review of the literature, the authors suggests that intellectually disabled sexual offenders may be most likely to offend via the automatic pathway or the avoidant-passive pathway. The potential treatment implications of the self-regulation model for intellectually disabled sexual offenders is discussed, as well as the need for empirical evaluation with regards to the application of this model to the intellectually disabled sexual offender population.

Journal article

Staff stress and people who have mental health needs living in new models of service

Author:
ROSE John L.
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 3(2), June 2009, pp.20-25.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper introduces some of the research that has been conducted into staff stress in learning disability services. It also examines how some individual characteristics of service users, particularly challenging behaviour and mental health problems, may influence the levels of staff stress reported. Service changes as a result of the development of supported living are also considered briefly. Some suggestions are made as to how these changes might influence staff. The importance of new research investigating these developments from a staff perspective is highlighted.

Journal article

A comparison of the application of the self-regulation model of the relapse process for mainstream and special needs sexual offenders

Authors:
KEELING Jenny A., ROSE John L., BEECH Anthony R.
Journal article citation:
Sexual Abuse a Journal of Research and Treatment, 18(4), October 2006, pp.373-382.
Publisher:
Sage

The self-regulation model of the relapse process (Ward & Hudson, 2000) has been developed and empirically validated on general sexual offender populations (Bickley & Beech, 2002), but not on specific sexual offender populations. This paper aims to investigate whether special needs offenders, as compared to mainstream sexual offenders, can be categorized into the offence pathways described in the model. In addition, this paper aims to evaluate the application of the self-regulation model in highlighting the treatment needs of the special needs group. Special needs sexual offenders are defined as a treatment population that includes individuals with lower functioning, limited social and communication skills, and literacy deficits. Participants were classified into the self-regulation model using a method developed by Bickley and Beech (2002). Demographic and offence information were collected and comparisons made between the special needs and mainstream groups. The results showed that the sexual offenders with special needs could be reliably classified into the offence pathways of the self-regulation model. The largest group of special needs offenders was in the approach-automatic group, followed by the approach-explicit group. The results indicated no significant differences in representation in the offence pathways between the special needs and mainstream sexual offenders. The results also indicate that the special needs group would benefit from a responsive approach to treatment, which incorporates appropriate treatment targets identified by the self-regulation model.

Journal article

The adaptation of a cognitive-behavioural treatment programme for special needs sexual offenders

Authors:
KEELING Jenny A., ROSE John L.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 34(2), June 2006, pp.110-116.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article describes the process of adapting an existing sexual offender treatment programme for use with sexual offenders who have special needs in an Australian correctional setting. The population comprised individuals with a variety of special needs including borderline or mild intellectual functioning, severe literacy problems, significant communication difficulties, and other important deficits and special needs. It should be noted that some of these special needs individuals would not meet the diagnostic criteria for intellectual disability and this programme is aimed at the broader group inclusive of a number of special needs. Therapeutic adaptations have been guided by current research and practice, and specific examples are described and discussed. The authors believe that these adaptations may also have some utility for mainstream sexual offender treatment programmes. Research into the efficacy of these treatment adaptations with this population is currently underway.

Journal article

Implications of the self-regulation model for treatment with sexual offenders with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
KEELING Jenny A., ROSE John L.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Forensic Practice, 14(1), 2012, pp.29-39.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper discusses the treatment implications of the self-regulation model (SRM) for sexual offenders with an intellectual disability in an effort to provide practical evidence that could be applied to treatment. Research has focussed on the application and implications of this theoretical model for mainstream sexual offenders. However, more recently, there has been an increasing interest in the application and treatment implications for the SRM for sexual offenders with an intellectual disability. This paper reviews literature on both the SRM and related work on offenders with intellectual disability. The SRM of sexual offending proposes that difficulties in self-regulation may lead to an increased risk of sexual offending. It describes four potential pathways to sexual offending that are based on self-regulation style and offence-related goals. Specific characteristics of sexual offenders with an intellectual disability are also associated with different pathways of the SRM. The evidence reviewed supports the belief that the SRM is a valid theoretical model on which to base treatment programmes for people with intellectual disabilities and specific recommendations are made for the design of treatment programmes with this client group. Examples of specific adapted programmes are provided.

Journal article

Care staff perceptions of challenging behaviour and fear of assault

Authors:
ROSE John L., CLEARY Adam
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 32(2), June 2007, pp.153-161.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

 This study investigates fear of assault in relation to exposure to challenging behaviour. The extent to which a social psychological model of fear of assault can be generalised to care staff working with individuals with intellectual disability (ID) was tested and the validity of the instruments used was assessed. A total of 87 care staff took part in a questionnaire-based study carried out in two separate and distinct organisations providing residential services to individuals with ID. In one service, staff exposure to challenging behaviour was high, with many clients having a forensic history, and in the other, staff exposure to challenging behaviour was low. According to one measure, care staff exposed to high levels of challenging behaviour were more fearful about work-related violence. However, no difference was found between the groups on the second measure. Regression analyses indicated some support for the generalisability of dimensions of the model of fear of assault in explaining feelings of unsafety. This study suggests that fear of assault may be an important factor when trying to understand care staff responses to challenging behaviour. However, the equivocal nature of the results raises questions about the validity of existing methods of assessing this fear.

Journal article

The development of a questionnaire to assess the perceptions of care staff towards people with intellectual disabilities who display challenging behaviour

Authors:
WILLIAMS Ruth J., ROSE John L.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 11(2), June 2007, pp.197-211.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

The perceptions of staff about challenging behaviour may be a key factor in designing successful behavioural interventions. There is a lack of robust psychometric instruments designed to assess staff attributions towards incidents of challenging behaviour. The aim of this research was to develop a scale based upon the self-regulation theory of illness behaviour. Two staff focus groups identified and clarified relevant constructs to be included in the Challenging Behaviour Perception Questionnaire (CBPQ), which was then completed by 51 staff. Some correlations between the CBPQ and the Attributional Style Questionnaire were found. A significant amount of the variance in the perception of challenging behaviour was explained by the subscales of the new questionnaire. In particular, episodic timeline would seem to be a promising area for further investigation.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts