Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 31

Journal article

Students’ attitudes towards individuals with an intellectual disability

Authors:
PATEL Meera, ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 18(1), 2014, pp.90-103.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

The aim of the study was to investigate attitudes held by a British student population towards individuals with an intellectual disability. Students participated in focus groups addressing their attitudes, behaviours and perceptions of individuals with an intellectual disability. Thematic analysis was the method used to identify emergent themes. Results identified five main themes in relation to intellectual disabilities. The themes suggest that attitude scales fail to effectively measure the multidimensional nature of British student’s attitudes towards intellectual disabilities. One out of the five emergent attitude themes from the current study is sufficiently represented in measures of attitudes towards intellectual disability. These results suggest a need to modify current attitude scales or develop new ones to measure the British population’s attitudes towards intellectual disabilities. A lack of knowledge about intellectual disabilities was also identified. Participants recognized exposure through the media as a tool to increase knowledge. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The relationship between the recognition in facial expressions and self-reported anger in people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
WOODCOCK Kate A., ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20(3), May 2007, pp.279-284.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study aims to examine the relationship between how individuals with intellectual disabilities report their own levels of anger, and the ability of those individuals to recognize emotions. It was hypothesized that increased expression of anger would be linked to lower ability to recognize facial emotional expressions and increased tendency to interpret facial expressions in a hostile or negative manner. It was also hypothesized increased levels of anger may lead to the altered perception of a particular emotion. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Thirty participants completed a test of facial emotion recognition (FER), and a self-report anger inventory (Benson & Ivins 1992) as part of a structured interview. Individuals with higher self-reported anger did not show significantly reduced performance in FER, or interpret facial expressions in a more hostile manner compared with individuals with less self-reported anger. However, they were less accurate in recognizing neutral facial emotions. It is tentatively suggested that individuals with high levels of anger may be likely to perceive emotional content in a neutral facial expression because of their high levels of emotional arousal.

Journal article

The offence process of sex offenders with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative study

Authors:
COUTNEY Jude, ROSE John, MASON Oliver
Journal article citation:
Sexual Abuse a Journal of Research and Treatment, 18(2), April 2006, pp.169-191.
Publisher:
Sage

There have been few attempts to build a model of sexual offending for men with intellectual disabilities and hence clarify appropriate intervention. This American study examines any commonalities that characterize the offence process of such men. Using a grounded theory approach, qualitative interviews with nine sex offenders with intellectual disabilities are analyzed to generate a model of the offence process. Data from qualitative interviews with clinicians is used to triangulate offender participants’ data. The subsequent model highlights the importance of individual’s attitudes and beliefs and the impact that they have at all stages of the offence process. It raises issues concerning the variation in the process that is seen within and between offences. Additionally, it identifies a marked lack of awareness of any “decency insult” in these offenders, an inability to empathize with society’s view of sex offending. A clear implication is that thorough assessment and formulation are likely to be the key to successful and appropriate intervention.

Journal article

Stress and residential staff: towards an integration of existing research

Author:
ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 8(4), 1995, pp.220-236.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Examines the literature relating to stress in staff who care for people with learning disabilities. The majority of published studies have considered stress in residential staff. When assessing the studies, it soon becomes apparent that there is considerable variability between them in terms of methodology and results. However, the main reason for the range of results probably represent differences in organisational structure of the services surveyed. Despite this variability some simple general trends emerge which suggest that potential stressors and supports vary depending upon their proximity within the organisational structure. Models are presented on how these inter-relationships might be considered.

Journal article

A consumer survey of adults with learning disabilities currently doing work experience: their satisfaction with work and wishes for the future

Authors:
SHANLY Angela, ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 6(3), 1993, pp.250-262.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Reports on research into the attitudes of eighteen people with learning disabilities at a day centre in Oxford towards their work experience programme, and their preference for full-time or part-time work. The research design incorporated a number of open-ended, yes/no and either/or questions in order to reduce the problems of acquiescence and inconsistency often found when interviewing people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Understanding the experiences and needs of South Asian families caring for a child with learning disabilities in the United Kingdom: an experiential–contextual framework

Authors:
HEER Kuljit, ROSE John, LARKIN Michael
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 27(7), 2012, pp.949-963.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

The prevalence of learning disabilities is thought to be almost three times higher amongst the South Asian community than any other community in the United Kingdom. Despite this higher prevalence, service uptake and utilisation amongst the South Asian community in the United Kingdom remains low and may be linked to differences in the understanding and interpretations of learning disability amongst South Asian communities. The experiences of South Asian families caring for a child with learning disabilities within the United Kingdom are multifaceted. This article proposes an experiential-contextual framework for exploring these experiences. The framework incorporates minority experiences as well as medical and social models of disability. The experiential-contextual framework has been applied to understanding important aspects of South Asians experiences, including: the interpretations and understanding of learning disabilities; interactions with healthcare systems; minority group pressures; and the influence of acculturation and diversity within ethnic groups.

Journal article

Assessing motivation for work in people with developmental disabilities

Authors:
ROSE John, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 14(2), June 2010, pp.147-155.
Publisher:
Sage
Place of publication:
London

Factors that might influence motivation for work have been neglected in previous investigations in the process of people with intellectual disabilities finding employment. This article describes the development of The Work Readiness Scale which was largely adapted from The Readiness to Change Questionnaire. A structured interview was conducted with 69 people with developmental and intellectual disabilities while at the supported employment agency or vocational training centre in a large city in England. A subgroup of 43 individuals completed the questionnaire again about two weeks later. A member of staff who knew the person well was asked to independently rate the motivational level of the individual. The questionnaire seems to have reasonable psychometric properties and may have utility in assessing individuals for work and designing appropriate training to find work.

Journal article

Improving mental health services for people with intellectual disabilities: service users' views

Authors:
O'BRIEN Alex, ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 4(4), December 2010, pp.40-47.
Publisher:
Emerald

It is widely considered that people with intellectual disabilities are more likely to experience mental health problems than people in the general population. The aim of this study was to seek the opinions of people with an intellectual disability who have additional mental health needs about the mental health services they receive. A semi-structured focus group methodology was used to ask the 8 participants about all aspects of the mental health services they receive, including inpatient facilities, professional contact, the support received in residential or supported living settings, and day opportunities. Four key themes were generated from the findings: views about being in hospital: good vs crap; ‘it hurt me when…’: responses of other to their difficulties; meaningful activity and employment; and needing help and support vs control. Overall, it was found that the participants valued staff who listened to them and actively tried to help with their difficulties. They also wanted choice and control over their lives, particularly with regard to meaningful day activities.

Journal article

Psychological factors associated with obtaining employment

Authors:
HENSEL Elizabeth, KROESE Biza Stenfert, ROSE John
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20(2), March 2007, pp.175-181.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Less than 10% of people with intellectual disabilities are employed. The aim of the present study was to investigate what psychological factors might predict employment outcome for people with intellectual disability who had received a placement in a supported employment service. Sixty people were interviewed whilst they were in the supported employment preparation agency and where possible 3 and 9 months after leaving. The structured interview included a number of psychological measures. Those who subsequently gained employment were compared with those who did not. Those who gained employment were significantly more motivated by status aspiration, and judged themselves significantly less happy than those who did not gain employment, at the first interview. It is possible that people who are more dissatisfied with their life might be more motivated to change their circumstances. Supported employment agencies might consider using a measure of motivation as an entry criterion or as a way of identifying who needs help with developing motivation.

Journal article

An examination of the relationship between staff behaviour and stress levels in residential care

Authors:
ROSE John, MULLAN Ellen, FLETCHER Ben
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 7(4), 1995, pp.312-327.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Examines the relationship between levels of stress and the observed performance at work of direct care staff in one community unit and two group homes for people with learning disabilities. Staff were given a questionnaire which measured their levels of stress and factors which they perceived could have influenced them. Staff were also observed in detail at work and asked to report on levels of stress during these observation periods. No significant differences in levels of stress were found between the staff in group homes and community units. There was greater staff/resident interaction in the group homes, suggesting that quality improvements in residential environments can be achieved without affecting staff stress. A number of factors, particularly relationships with other staff and management, are discussed as of vital importance in influencing stress levels.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts