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Journal article

Making information easier for people with learning disabilities

Authors:
RODGERS Jackie, NAMAGANDA Syson
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 33(2), June 2005, pp.52-58.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article describes the methods used in the 'Information for All' project which aimed to create guidance on making information easier for people with learning disabilities. The research was carried out by the Norah Fry Research Centre and the Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB) multiple disability service. The researchers and people with learning disabilities worked together to interview information providers about approaches they had used, to carry out a literature review and to create guidance on how to make information easier.  Key findings from the project were the necessity of a clear aim when planning information, the need to consider carefully the best format or media for sharing your message and most importantly, to work with your intended audience when creating information. The article goes on to discuss the importance of making information appropriate for all sections of the community, including people from black and minority ethnic groups.

Journal article

The Information for All project

Author:
RODGERS Jackie
Journal article citation:
Focus, 42, May 2005, pp.3-5.
Publisher:
RNIB

The author reports on the 'Information for All' project, which was carried out by researchers at the Norah Fry Research Centre in Bristol and RNIB Multiple Disability Team, in partnership with people with learning disabilities. The research aimed to provide guidance on making information accessible to people with learning difficulties. The article describes the process of carrying out the research and outlines the main sections of the resulting guidance produced.

Journal article

Trying to get it right: undertaking research involving people with learning difficulties

Author:
RODGERS Jackie
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 14(4), July 1999, pp.421-433.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article describes the authors' experience of undertaking research involving people with learning difficulties in the context of an emerging emancipatory paradigm.

Journal article

The knowledge people with learning disabilities and their carers have about psychotropic medication

Authors:
HESLOP Pauline, FOLKES Liz, RODGERS Jackie
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 10(4), October 2005, pp.10-18.
Publisher:
Emerald

Psychotropic medications are a treatment commonly used for people with learning disabilities. Legislation and guidance suggest that, for a person to give informed consent to treatment, they must have knowledge of the potential treatment. This study of 21 people with learning disabilities, and their carers and prescribers, living in four different regions of England, suggests that few of the people with learning disabilities were fully informed about their treatment.  Many of their carers said that although they know how to administer the medication, they know little about why the person was taking it and what the implications might be. Despite this, people with learning disabilities made the general assumption that carers would, or should, know everything about their medication. The current provision of information to people with learning disabilities and carers was found to be poor. For key strategies identified in supporting people with learning disabilities in obtaining information about medication were spending more time providing and reiterating key information, providing accurate, up-to-date, accessible information about medication, providing training for carers in wider aspects of medication usage, and tailoring information to each person's individual needs.

Journal article

Commissioning information for people with learning difficulties

Authors:
RODGERS Jackie, TOWNSLEY Ruth
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 13(2), April 2005, pp.44-48.
Publisher:
Emerald

Organisations need to think about how to share information with people with learning difficulties. Draws on findings from a recent research to inform the commissioning of easier read information. Its aim is to promote more effective information provision and the best possible value for money.

Journal article

Getting informed: research the production of accessible information for people with learning difficulties

Authors:
TOWNSLEY Ruth, RODGERS Jackie, FOLKES Liz
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 11(3), June 2003, pp.39-43.
Publisher:
Emerald

Reports on the Information for All Project at the Norah Fry Research Centre, which in investigating the current evidence on accessible information. The study has involved a systematic review of the research literature, and interviews with information providers (including service user-led groups) about their practical experience of making information easier to understand. Major themes emerging include the importance of defining the target audience and their information needs and involving this audience through direct consultation and evaluation.

Book Full text available online for free

Action for health: health action plans and health facilitation: detailed good practice guidance on implementation for learning disability partnership boards

Authors:
RODGERS Jackie, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
73p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This good practice guidance explains how people can be supported to access the health care they need from both primary care and other NHS services. It shows how personal health action plans can help to improve the health of all people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Menstrual problems experienced by women with learning disabilities

Authors:
RODGERS Jackie, LIPSCOMBE Jo, SANTER Miriam
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 19(4), December 2006, pp.364-373.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Menstruation appears to be problematic for women with learning disabilities, yet there has been little quantitative research on their experiences, or comparisons with other groups of women. This paper considers the nature and extent of menstrual problems experienced by women with learning disabilities. The data reported here come from a cross-sectional postal questionnaire survey conducted with carers of 452 women in the United Kingdom, aged 14–55 years, who had learning disabilities. Women with learning disabilities appear to be as likely to experience menstrual problems as other women. However, such problems may be experienced differently and more negatively and may not always be recognized appropriately. More attention needs to be given to menstrual problems experienced by women with learning disabilities, both in research and in practice. It is particularly important that women with learning disabilities be supported to play a central role in recognizing and defining the problems they experience.

Journal article

The nature and extent of help given to women with intellectual disabilities to manage menstruation

Authors:
RODGERS Jackie, LIPSCOMBE Jo
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 30(1), March 2005, pp.45-52.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Menstruation has been shown to be problematic for many women with intellectual disabilities. There has been a greater focus on menstrual suppression or elimination than on help and training to manage menstrual care successfully. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in England to investigate the help and training currently given to women with intellectual disabilities. Results found 29 percent of the women had never been given the opportunity to learn how to manage their own menstrual care. Where someone had tried to teach the woman, this was most often her mother. Carers were giving considerable amounts of assistance with menstrual care, although some of the women with more profound disabilities were able to manage menstrual care independently. The authors argue that all women with intellectual disabilities should have the chance to manage or assist with their own menstrual care, backed by a strategic approach to menstrual education and support.

Journal article

Difference and choice: exploring prenatal testing and the use of genetic information with people with learning difficulties

Authors:
WARD Linda, HOWARTH Joyce, RODGERS Jackie
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 30(2), June 2002, pp.50-55.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Developments in genetics have huge implications for disabled people (including people with learning difficulties) and their families. There is a potential for greater understanding of - and ultimately, perhaps, treatments for - serious conditions like cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anaemia, but there are also concerns about the negative implications, including the potential for discrimination in insurance and employment. This present article describes two workshops that explained the use of prenatal testing and genetic information to inform choices in pregnancy to people with learning difficulties, and then explores the issues with them and the contribution subsequently made by these people.

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