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Book

Respite care: summaries and suggestions; final report to the Department of Health

Authors:
ROBINSON Carol, STALKER Kirsten
Publisher:
University of Bristol. Norah Fry Research Centre
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
30p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bristol

Final summary report of a 3 year study into respite care services for children and young people (up to age 20) with a range of disabilities, but particularly severe learning difficulties.

Journal article

Pride and prejudice?

Author:
ROBINSON Carol
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap, 16(4), December 1988, pp.143-146.
Publisher:
British Institute of Mental Handicap

Reports on a study to discover why families did not make use of a respite care scheme.

Book

A survey of family based respite care services

Authors:
ORLIK Christopher, ROBINSON Carol, RUSSELL Oliver
Publishers:
National Association for Family Based Respite Care, University of Bristol. Norah Fry Research Centre
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
41p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bristol

Report bringing together information on 265 schemes which offer short term respite care to people with learning difficulties or physical disabilities.

Book Full text available online for free

Learning disabilities health charter for social care providers: self assessment tool

Authors:
TURNER Sue, ROBINSON Carol
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
13
Place of publication:
London

This self assessment tool has been developed to support the implementation of the Health Charter, to help social care providers assess who well they progressing in delivering the Charter for people with learning disabilities. Each of the statements have a number of questions which an organisation can score themselves against. Issues covered in the charter include: mental capacity law; listening to and involving family carers; providing training to staff on health and wellbeing issues; providing accessible information to people with a learning disability; providing support to attend appointments; promote access to screening tests; and facilitating annual health checks. Organisations can then use their self assessment to make changes to practice. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Improving the health and wellbeing of people with learning disabilities: guidance for social care providers and commissioners (to support implementation of the health charter)

Authors:
TURNER Sue, ROBINSON Carol
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
29
Place of publication:
London

People with learning disabilities have poorer health than the general population, much of which is avoidable. This means that people with learning disabilities experience health inequalities. A Health Charter, consisting of a series of pledges, has been developed to help support social care providers to improve the health and well-being of people with learning disabilities. This guidance document explains each of the Health Charter's 11 statements, outlines why they are important, and provides case examples and links to useful resources for each. Issues covered in the charter include: mental capacity law; listening to and involving family carers; providing training to staff on health and wellbeing issues; providing accessible information to people with a learning disability; providing support to attend appointments; promote access to screening tests; and facilitating annual health checks.

Book Full text available online for free

Health inequalities and people with learning disabilities in the UK: 2011: implications and actions for commissioners

Authors:
TURNER Sue, ROBINSON Carol
Publisher:
Improving Health and Lives: Learning Disabilities Observatory
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
Stockton-on-Tees
Edition:
Rev. ed.

People with learning disabilities face serious health inequalities, partly arising from difficulties they encounter in using health services. Health services have a duty to make the adjustments necessary to give them equal access. This document provides guidance for those people with responsibility for commissioning services about ways to increase access to, and improve healthcare. The guidance will also be of interest to family carers and professionals interested in the welfare of people with learning disabilities. Effective commissioning to address these inequalities will involve a number of key actions including: Ensuring that the health inequalities faced by people with learning disabilities are carefully documented in the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA); Taking action to commission with all relevant partner agencies, services which address the determinants of health inequalities; Improving the number and quality of annual health checks; and Improving the number and quality of annual health checks.

Journal article

Carers of people with learning disabilities, and their experience of the 1995 Carers Act

Authors:
ROBINSON Carol, WILLIAMS Val
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 32(2), March 2002, pp.169-183.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

This paper seeks to highlight the impact of the Carers (Recognition and Services) Act of 1995 on carers of people with learning disabilities. It draws on research conducted in the south west between 1997 and 1999, which examined the views and experiences of carers who had an assessment of their needs, together with those of the person they care for and the professional conducting the assessment. It concludes that the Carers Act is not widely used, or understood, by this group of carers. Recommendations for improving practice include changes to the current terminology, new triggers for a carer's needs assessment, and a greater input from other agencies, especially health services. Although the current paper focuses on the views and experiences of carers, an exploration of the Carers Act, and its effect on potential conflicts of interest with the person with learning disabilities, is available elsewhere.

Journal article

Parents' views of different respite care services

Authors:
STALKER Kirsten, ROBINSON Carol
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 7(2), 1994, pp.97-117.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

This paper focuses on one part of a three-year study into respite care services to disabled children. Findings from previous research are outlined, an overview and methodology of the study of consumers' views are presented, and results discussed.

Journal article

Making the break from 'respite care': a keynote review

Author:
ROBINSON Carol
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 22(2), 1994, pp.42-45.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Seeks to describe the development of respite services in the UK from their beginnings as relief care for carers to the emerging view of services as offering a potentially positive experience for disabled people.

Journal article

Someone to turn to

Authors:
ROBINSON Carol, et al
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 2.5.91, 1991, pp.24-25.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Describes the pattern of respite care schemes in the U.K. and highlights the resource implications for users and respite carers.

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