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Reasonably adjusted? Mental health services and support for people with autism and people with learning disabilities

Authors:
BATES Peter, TURNER Sue, NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
65
Place of publication:
Bath

The law requires mental health services to make reasonable adjustments so that they stop discriminating against people with autism or learning disabilities. ‘Reasonably adjusted?’ describes the reasonable adjustments mental health services have put in place for people with learning disabilities and people with autism. It is organised in three sections, starting with a summary of the context. The second section follows a care pathway from first contact with primary care services through referral to specialist help and on to discharge, reporting on the adjustments made by individuals and organisations that are trying to provide high quality services to people and their families The third section: ‘Effective services in a flourishing community’ begins with a broad view of active citizenship and follows an organisational pathway. ‘Reasonably adjusted?’ offers practical examples and includes an easy ready summary. Its content forms the basis of a subsequent NDTi publication, ‘The green light toolkit’ (2013). (Edited publisher abstract)

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Green light toolkit 2013: a guide to auditing and improving your mental health services so that it is effective in supporting people with autism and learning disabilities

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
76
Place of publication:
Bath

An earlier report by NDTi, ‘Reasonably adjusted’ (2012) described the reasonable adjustments mental health services were already putting in place for people with learning disabilities and people with autism. The NHS Confederation, supported by the Department of Health, commissioned the NDTi to develop and produce materials to help services review their own quality and share and replicate good practice. These are published as the Green Light Toolkit 2013, which comprise practical new materials designed to help improve the quality of mental health services for adults with learning disabilities and/or autism. The toolkit includes an audit framework to support reviews; an easy-read version of the audit framework and toolkit; and examples. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Why we need local pathways for children with learning disabilities and/or autism whose behaviours challenge (including those with a metal health condition)

Authors:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION, CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR FOUNDATION
Publishers:
National Development Team for Inclusion, Challenging Behaviour Foundation
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
5
Place of publication:
Bath

Building the Right Support (NHS England et al., 2015) sets out a national plan to develop community services and close inpatient facilities for people with a learning disability and/or autism who display behaviour that challenges. This plan covers children and young people, and includes a new service model of local support arrangements to prevent admission. This explanatory note explains why local pathways are needed to improve outcomes for children and families, target public funding more effectively, and fulfil the duties under the Children and Families Act 2014. It also lists the range of organisations who are responsible for the development and delivery of local pathways. It is one of a set of three resources commissioned by the NHS England Transforming Care Programme help Transforming Care partnerships, local authorities and CCGs to work together with local families. (Edited publisher abstract)

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An all age strategy for people with learning disabilities who challenge: sharing learning from the Gloucestershire strategy

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
2
Place of publication:
Bath

This insight draws on learning from the Gloucestershire Challenging Behaviour Strategy and evaluation of the strategy by the NDTi over an 18 month period. The strategy has three key elements: a peer support network of families; an all age intensive support service; and positive behaviour support and positive behaviour management training for all provider services. The paper argues that having an all age strategy that works across social care, health and provider services, and ensuring this is co-ordinated so that it is seen as one strategy rather than a collection of initiatives has been an important factor in the success of the strategy. In addition to the outcomes delivered by the strategy, there have been a number of knock on benefits, including, the increased engagement of family carers in service development. Key to its success has been the flexible approach of the strategy and its ability to respond to the learning from implementation. While it is hard to get good information on the cost effectiveness of preventive services, there is anecdotal evidence of improved outcomes, and good data from the use of the Health Equalities Framework for adults using intensive support services. (Edited publisher abstract)

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The Health Equalities Framework: embedding good practice: report from two workshops to support implementation

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
11
Place of publication:
Bath

Summarises the findings from two workshops for organisations and family carers who are using the Health Equalities Framework (HEF). The report examines how the HEF is being implemented, sets out the lessons learnt, and outlines current initiatives and potential developments. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Families and personalisation project: key learning outcomes summary for families, local authorities and support providers

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
9p.
Place of publication:
Bath

The Better Lives programme was set up in response to concern about how families of people with learning disabilities were, or more commonly were not, becoming involved in and benefiting from the personalisation process. Specifically, the aim was to understand how to engage, inform and support families to achieve real personal outcomes beyond just a personal budget. The programme involved working with groups of families in 3 locations (Suffolk, Calderdale and Wolverhampton) over a period of 18 months. Despite each of the local authorities having people or departments responsible for engaging with and informing families, very few families who took part in the programme had previously been aware of the personalisation agenda and those few knew very little. The programme involved a variety of methods which included information sharing, planning, engaging with statutory services, and delivering real outcomes for the participating families. This document summarises the suggested learning outcomes from the programme for: working with families; local authorities; and support providers.

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The real tenancy test: tenancy rights in supported living

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
Bath

The second paper from a three-year project on Housing and Social Inclusion led by the NDTi. The briefing summarises the findings from a project to create a which aimed to provide a simple tool to help them address the issue of housing rights for people with learning disabilities. The Real Tenancy Test is a quick test to be used in supported living and tenancy based supported housing to determine if real tenancy rights are being met. It is designed to get an understanding of whether a tenancy in supported living gives real tenancy rights. It describes important things to consider when planning housing and tenancies for people, including when to use different types of tenancies and how to handle issues of capacity. It says that for the tenancy to be genuine, the following should be happening: a tenancy agreement is in place; the tenant has control over where they live; the tenant has control over who they live with; the tenant has control over who supports them and how they are supported; and the tenant has control over what happens in their home.

Book Full text available online for free

Supported living: making the move

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
Bath

This briefing paper arises from a three year project on housing and social inclusion in England, and summarises some of the finding of the main report. It is written mainly for people who work directly or indirectly to plan, develop and provide housing and support for people with learning disabilities. It explains the difference between supported living and residential care. It also describes different types of housing and support that should be available for people, and how to go about putting them in place. Among the conclusions is the fact that while residential care might be right for some people, it should not be the only or predominant choice of housing for adults with learning disabilities. The briefing also suggests that the main focus should be maximising housing rights, choice control and independence. Access to a wider range of models is needed and as these emerge a more flexible mix of support will be required including greater emphasis on connecting people with their communities.

Book Full text available online for free

Better health for people with learning disabilities

Authors:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION, VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS DISABILITY GROUP
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
Bristol

This guide provides information for social care providers and support workers on how they can help improve the health of the people with learning disabilities they support. Specifically, it looks at the covers the role they can play to ensure that people with learning disabilities are on the GP learning disability Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) register, get annual health checks and have additional information on their Summary Care Record that says what reasonable adjustments they need. The guide has been commissioned by NHS England has been developed by NDTI with the support of the VODG. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Getting it right with young people whose behaviour challenges: commissioning for lifelong outcomes

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
2
Place of publication:
Bath

Summarises key findings from work carried out by the NDTi in the East Midlands and NHS East Midlands which aimed to investigate the support available for young people with learning disabilities whose behaviour challenges and to examine how to improve outcomes. The study gathered views of people with learning disabilities whose behaviour challenges, their families, social care and health staff, managers and commissioners. It included both the views of people with positive outcomes who were living in the community or connected to family and friends and also people with poor outcomes who have moved away to institutional placements. Findings discuss the changes that need to be made to services in three main areas: strategy and structure, commissioning and service management; and practice. The report highlights the need for a lifelong perspective when planning for children and young people, and ensuring that support is designed and delivered in ways that will be successful and sustainable into adult life. The findings will be of interest to commissioners and managers in social care, public health, health and education who are responsible for services to children, young people and adults with learning disabilities. (Edited publisher abstract)

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