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A recipe for abuse

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Findings and recommendations are presented from the investigation into the care and treatment of residents of a Supported Landlord Scheme. 'Supported Landlord Schemes' are forms of housing for people who need some extra help and support. The report found that it is a matter of major concern that vulnerable people with learning disabilities were living: in an unregistered service, in the care of people who were not approved providers and without proper care management in a place where there was a known culture of restriction and punishment.

Book Full text available online for free

Working with independent advocates: good practice guidance for working with independent advocates

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

In the course of the work of the Mental Welfare Commission, service users and independent advocates have voiced their concerns about involvement of advocacy. They have heard of situations where advocates were excluded from important meetings, or were not given the information they needed to fully advocate on behalf of an individual. The Mental Welfare Commission has also heard from practitioners that they are often uncertain about what involvement the advocate should have, especially if a person has a severe mental illness or learning disability that makes it difficult for him or her to involve an advocate. The authors collected some examples difficult situations and case studies to consult with a variety of practitioner, advocacy and service user groups. They also considered the legal framework, notably mental health and incapacity law in Scotland and data protection legislation. It is hoped that the guidance and case examples will help practitioners to understand the role of independent advocacy and provide assistance when dealing with difficult situations.

Book Full text available online for free

Investigation into the care and treatment of Ms L

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report relates to the investigation into the care and treatment of Ms L. Several recommendations are made both for the services responsible for Ms L and for other services who may be able to learn from this individual case. This MWC investigation was instigated following reports of a number of incidents involving Ms L, a young woman with a severe learning disability and severe challenging behaviour, in an independent assessment and treatment resource for people with a learning disability (Unit A). The final incident, where Ms L was apparently bitten by a fellow resident overnight, resulted in a Vulnerable Adults Case Conference being called. Ms L had already been assessed as ready to move on and a place identified for her to go to. This move was therefore brought forward by about 2 weeks.

Book Full text available online for free

A hospital or a home? Findings from themed visits to NHS and private sector wards for people with learning disabilities

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Commission undertook a themed visit to all learning disability in-patient units during the 2007-08 visiting programme. The Commission visited 39 facilities across Scotland from 25 October to 7 November 2007. Prior to the visits, health boards were asked to provide some information about the wards in their areas. Staff were asked a series of questions about the people living in the ward on the day of the visit and about how care and treatment was provided. Commission staff met with individual patients and some relatives and carers. The Commission was particularly interested in seeing how assessment of individual need was taking place and the ways identified needs were being met. Commission staff also looked for evidence within files that would indicate how individual people and carers were being involved in decisions about current and future care. Key recommendations are outlined.

Book Full text available online for free

Justice denied: a summary of our investigation into the care and treatment of Ms A

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Ms A is a 67 year old woman with a learning disability who has been in the care of the local authority since she was eight years old. This investigation into Ms A’s care was initiated in September 2006, after the Mental Welfare Commission was contacted by a housing association who were concerned about her vulnerability. They said Ms A had reported being raped. When they contacted the police, they discovered that similar assaults were alleged to have taken place previously. The housing association said that the social work department had not informed them of Ms A’s history of assaults and her related vulnerability. A key motivation for the investigation was the conviction that the circumstances surrounding Ms A’s experiences are not unique. Several recommendations are made that identify ways in which the Scottish Government, NHS Boards, social work departments, police, and professional regulatory bodies could improve our protective and judicial responses to people with a learning disability.

Book Full text available online for free

"No fear as long as we work together"

Authors:
SOCIAL WORK INSPECTION AGENCY, MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Social Work Inspection Agency
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
150p.

This report details the follow up joint inspection of Scottish Borders Council and NHS Borders by the Social Work Inspection Agency and the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland. The focus on the inspection is to verify the implementation of their action plan for services for people with learning disabilities. The action plan itself is the response to the Social Work Services Inspectorate and Mental Welfare Commission Reports (May 2004) into the abuse of a number of vulnerable adults with learning disabilities in the Scottish borders region.

Book Full text available online for free

Decisions about technology: principles and guidance on good practice when considering the use of telecare and assistive technology for people with dementia, learning disability and related disorders

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
23
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This guidance is for those considering the use of technology to assist with care and maintain independence when the individual concerned may lack the capacity to make the decision. It examines the human right and legal implications of assistive technology and sets out key principles of good practice. These are: the intervention must provide a benefit that cannot otherwise be achieved; it must be the least restrictive in relation to the person’s freedom in order to achieve the desired benefit; the past and present wishes of the person must be taken into account; the views of relevant others should be taken into account; and the intervention should encourage the person to use existing skills and develop new ones. The document examines the use of electronic location devices and the use of CCTV to monitor the actions of an adult or of staff. A brief overview of assistive technology currently available is also included. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Zero tolerance; measured response: responding to violence in mental health or learning disability care settings

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Although workplace violence is unacceptable, when it relates to mental ill-health within a care setting the issues are complex. Staff may be caught between providing appropriate and sensitive care for people whose mental disorder results in violence, and reporting significant incidents to the police in order to protect the person, other service users and themselves. This guidance looks at best practice in responding to incidents of violence in learning disability and mental health settings. It reflects the findings of a national consultation with a wide range of stakeholders using a number of anonymised case examples. The guidance questions the traditional idea of ‘zero tolerance’ and aims towards developing a more measured response. The 2 essential outcomes from all incidents of violence in mental health and learning disability care settings are: ensuring the safety of all persons; and ensuring that the needs of the person for care and treatment (and the needs of any others affected by the incident, including staff) continue to be met in a safe and appropriate care setting. A number of recommendations are provided on the development of policies in response to violent incidents.

Book Full text available online for free

A home of my own: report from visits to people with learning disabilities who are living in care homes which are registered with the Care Commission as having more than 20 places: June to September 2010

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
29p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

One of the ways in which the Mental Welfare Commission monitors individual care and treatment is through visit programmes in a range of settings throughout Scotland. These visits take place at home, in hospital or in any other setting where care and treatment is being delivered. This report presents findings from a programme of national themed visits to people with learning disabilities living in the larger residential care homes registered with the Care Commission as having more than 20 places. The visits are designed to assess and compare care and treatment for particular groups of people across Scotland. This report provides an overview of findings from a series of visits in Scotland between June and September 2010. Positive outcomes from the visits showed that people had pleasant homely bedrooms where they could spend time with their personal belongings, music, and TV and had some choice in the décor or furnishings. There was good access to primary health care services and Community Learning Disability Teams in nearly all units. However, communal units were less homely.

Book Full text available online for free

No through road: people with learning disabilities in hospital

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
54
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Presents the findings from visits to 18 hospital units for people with learning disability, a review of records of 104 people, just over half the people in the Scottish service, and interviews and feedback from service users and carers. The report shows that there has been improvement in some of the areas where concerns had been previously raised. Three quarters of the care plans had all needs clearly addressed, and there was good access to and use of specialist assessment. Access to activities appeared to have improved, and only a few issues were found with regard to people’s legal rights being respected. However, the problem of delayed discharge, well-recognised as a strategic issue, remains. The proportion of patients who are experiencing delays in their discharge was 22 percent when visits were carried out in 2010 and on this visit was 32 percent. The report argues that this has serious implications for the people who remain in hospital when this is no longer the best place for them, and for those who in consequence may be unable to be admitted when they need to be, and is a human rights issue. (Edited publisher abstract)

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