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Effective systems to support people with learning disabilities: strategic briefing

Author:
GREIG Rob
Publisher:
Research in Practice for Adults
Publication year:
2017
Place of publication:
Totnes

People with learning disabilities or autism have consistently poorer outcomes in areas such as health, life expectancy and quality of life. This includes their access to paid employment, housing, friendship and social networks. Social care support can help to enable people to address the inequalities they face as a result of learning disabilities. This Strategic Briefing talks through policy, evidence and practice to help leaders' plan social care systems to even out these inequalities so that people with learning disabilities can live good lives. It is aimed at senior decision-makers working across Adults’ Services. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

I've got an attitude problem

Author:
GREIG Rob
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 1.05.08, May 2008, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Valuing People has significantly influenced the agenda and level of public debate around services beyond the learning disability field. A lot that has been happening in the last five years in the wider social care front - for example, personalised individual budgets -which would not have happened without Valuing People. It was written as a programme that would last for three years and the fact we are taking policy to the next stage  and there's going to be continued investment to 2011, 10 years on, suggests there's something right about it. Also some people's lives and services have changed. People with learning disabilities and their families that things have got better - that's the acid test.

Journal article

Is there a future for the community learning disabilities team?

Authors:
GREIG Rob, PECK Edward
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 3(1), January 1998, pp.35-41.
Publisher:
Emerald

Provides a distillation of consultancy and service evaluation of Community Learning Disabilities, from across the country over the last five years. Finds that many community teams are in a state of organisational confusion and others have ceased to exist. Aims to help develop our understanding of what has been happening to these teams and identify the issues that need to be considered if these resources are to be used effectively in the future.

Book Full text available online for free

Valuing people: the story so far; a new strategy for learning disability in the 21st century

Author:
GREIG Rob
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
59p.
Place of publication:
London

Valuing People is a ‘cradle to grave’ policy – it covers the lives of both adults and children. However, just after Valuing People came out, new policies for children were written, such as the Children’s National Service Framework and ‘Every Child Matters’. As these policies are quite new, this report just talks about adults with learning disabilities – but transition to adulthood is included.

Journal article

Excluded from inclusion?

Author:
GREIG Rob
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 25.2.99, 1999, pp.2-3.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The author argues that people with learning difficulties are missing out on the new health and social policy agenda because of policy-makers' over-emphasis on access to mainstream services.

Book Full text available online for free

Supported living: making the move: developing supported living options for people with learning disabilities

Authors:
WOOD Alicia, GREIG Rob
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
28p.
Place of publication:
Bath

Many local authorities have changed services from residential care to supported housing for people with learning disabilities. Much of this change has focussed on achieving wider access to welfare benefits and having a tenancy. The aim of supported living to achieve choice, control and community inclusion has been much less of a focus. The result has been a focus on the housing ‘mechanics’ and as a consequence housing rights are often denied in practice, institutional practices continue in supported living and community inclusion and networks are not achieved. Over the coming 3 years, the NDTi Housing and Social Inclusion project will explore how to challenge and overcome some of the barriers that stop the shifting of resources from residential care to make the move towards real supported living. This paper has been written to promote discussion, debate and understanding about the obstacles that currently prevent adults with a learning disability from living in their own home in the ways that they want. Its objectives are to provide information that will help local people and organisations change and improve how they develop and deliver housing and support, and also to help inform national debate and discussion about how the policy and regulatory framework could change to help achieve this objective.

Journal article

Valuing people, not institutions

Author:
GREIG Rob
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 8(3), September 2005, pp.34-39.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article describes the author's experience of two meetings. One, with a self-advocate-led organisation, was concerned with helping it expand and make use of its work a 3 key issues: advice on parenting skills for parents with learning disability, accessible information on health for people with learning disability, and training in the use of accessible information. The second was with a group of senior service managers seeking advice on how to reorganise and restructure their service organisations. The author discusses the 'professional gift model' and the 'citizenship model' which set of concerns and actions had the potential for the greatest impact on the lives of people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Valuing people, not institutions

Author:
GREIG Rob
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 10(1), February 2005, pp.30-35.
Publisher:
Emerald

Describes the author's experience of two meetings. One, with a self-advocate-led organisation, was concerned with helping it expand and make use of its work a 3 key issues: advice on parenting skills for parents with learning disability, accessible information on health for people with learning disability, and training in the use of accessible information. The second was with a group of senior service managers seeking advice on how to reorganise and restructure their service organisations. Asks which set of concerns and actions had the potential for the greatest impact on the lives of people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Joint commissioning: searching for stability in an unstable world

Author:
GREIG Rob
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 2(1), January 1997, pp.19-25.
Publisher:
Emerald

Learning disability services have been at the forefront of attempts to develop effective joint working between health and local authority agencies. There is now an emergent framework for commissioners to work together and some, albeit patchy, experience of doing so. Joint commissioning has demonstrated potential benefits for service users, though there is still considerable scope for widening the range of stakeholders and more firmly establishing it in the host organisations. This article aims to clarify the nature of joint commissioning, making observations on experiences around the UK and suggesting issues and obstacles that require future consideration.

Journal article

Can self-advocacy impact upon culture?

Author:
GREIG Rob
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 20(2), 2015, pp.77-79.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: This paper provides a commentary on the article 'Changing organisational culture: another role for self-advocacy' by Robin Miller. Design/methodology/approach: The paper suggests that self-advocacy has the potential to be a significant influence on organisational culture, but questions whether self-advocacy's current funding regime and limited focus on outcomes makes this possible. Research limitations/implications: This issue is identified as one where further research would be beneficial. Practical implications: If organisations are to use self-advocacy as a route of cultural change, it is suggested that attention will need to be given to issues of independent funding, management change objectives and whole system change. Originality/value: If evidence were generated to support the belief that self-advocacy can impact on organisational culture, the consequences for how society and services behave towards people with learning disabilities could be significant. (Edited publisher abstract)

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