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Book Full text available online for free

Report of the learning disabilities scoping study setting out the case for a learning disabilities and autism research network in Wales

Authors:
FELCE David, KERR Mike, PERRY Jonathan
Publisher:
Welsh Centre for Learning Disabilities
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
37p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

People with learning disabilities are a particularly vulnerable and disadvantaged population with substantially poorer health and well-being than the general population. Research studies internationally are consistent in showing an inverse correlation between objective indicators of physical, material, social and developmental well-being and degree of disability. People with more severe and profound disabilities experience greater inequality in health and quality of life. They experience greater and more complex morbidity and differentially high mortality. Action on such evident disparities is consistent with the Welsh Assembly Government strategic agenda for 2003 - 2007.

Journal article

Facilitated communication: results from a number of recently published evaluations

Author:
FELCE David
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 22(4), 1994, pp.122-126.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Facilitated Communication (FC) is said by its proponents to allow people thought previously to have little or no expressive language to communicate in sometimes sophisticated ways about themselves, their feelings and their views on world. These claims challenge accepted understandings of intellectual and cognitive disability and language development. They have naturally caused controversy, the more so since FC involves direct physical guidance being given to enable the individual to spell out messages. Such guidance may permit direct facilitator control of the content of what is being communicated. Several research studies investigating the validity of FC and the possibility of facilitator influence have now been published. All of those described here show that individuals could not communicate beyond their previously recognised language abilities when facilitators have been prevented from knowing what response was required. This evidence alone suggests that the facilitators must shape the message being produced during FC. However, most studies also produced direct evidence that they do indeed do so. There is no basis for encouraging more widespread implementation of FC at the moment.

Book

Evaluating service quality

Authors:
EVANS Gerry, FELCE David, HOBBS Steve
Publisher:
Standing Conference of Voluntary Organisations for People with a Mental Handicap
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
79p.,list of orgs.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

Introduces the concept of evaluation, looks at types and methods of evaluation. Part 2 offers practical guidance on how to carry out an evaluation.

Book

Staffed housing for adults with severe or profound mental handicaps: the Andover project: summary report of a DHSS funded research project

Author:
FELCE David
Publisher:
British Institute of Mental Handicap
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
56p., tables, bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Kidderminster

The Andover Project grew out of the Wessex experiment, initiated in the 1960s, which aimed to provide residential services for people with severe or profound mental handicap in town locations near to their family homes.

Book

A guide to training resources in mental handicap

Authors:
AVERILL Linda, LEE Heather, FELCE David
Publisher:
British Institute for Mental Handicap/Central Council for Education and Training
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
63p., list of organisations.
Place of publication:
Bristol

In three sections : philosophy; service processes; are of a mentally handicapped person's life.

Journal article

Reflecting on research since 1987

Author:
FELCE David
Journal article citation:
Llais, 100, Autumn 2011, pp.14-18.
Publisher:
Learning Disability Wales

This article explores the gains made in learning disability research between 1987 and the present. It traces a connection between the major issues that dominated policy in 1987 and today, and explores the effect of the 1983 All Wales Strategy (AWS) which sought to develop comprehensive learning disability services enabling better access to resources for the community. The article looks at the improvement in outcomes that are generally experienced by service users, and how these improvements have been made via a greater push in the research arena. However, not all areas have seen such positive outcomes – challenging behaviour has been notoriously difficult to overcome, and are often determined by environmental factors outside the control of research. The article ends with a discussion of what needs to be further addressed in order to meet the goals of the AWS.

Journal article

The impact of repeated health checks for adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
FELCE David, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 21(6), November 2008, pp.585-596.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

An earlier study found that a structured health check conducted in primary care identified clinically significant previously unrecognized morbidity among adults with intellectual disabilities. This study aimed to examine whether follow-up health checks would identify equally significant newly identified morbidity and to investigate this as a function of the interval between health checks. Adults with intellectual disabilities who had had an initial health check (n = 108) participated: group 1 (n = 39) had a repeat health check an average of 28 months later, group 2 (n = 36) had a repeat health check an average of 44 months later and group 3 (n = 33) did not have a subsequent health check. Thirty participants in group 1 had a second repeat health check an average of 14 months after the first repeat. An audit of the results of the health check established whether morbidity was newly identified. Information was collected on each participant's age, gender, place of residence, skills, challenging behaviour, social abilities, psychiatric status and perceived health. Comparisons within groups over time or between groups at a point in time were made using non-parametric statistics. A similar number of newly identified health problems were found at the repeat health check compared to the initial check. The nature of needs identified was also similar. There was no association between the number of new needs identified at the repeat health check and the interval between it and the initial check. The perceived health of participants receiving health checks tended to decline. As the level of new need revealed by repeated checks at even the shortest interval since the previous check studied here (mean = 14 months) was as high as that found by the initial check, annual health checking could be a justifiable intervention for this population. Decline in perceived health may represent more accurate assessment by carers following feedback from the health checks.

Journal article

Staff knowledge of the side effects of anti-psychotic medication

Authors:
FRETWELL Christine, FELCE David
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20(6), November 2007, pp.580-585.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Anti-psychotic medications are widely prescribed to people with intellectual disabilities and have a range of negative side effects. The aim was to identify the level of knowledge of anti-psychotic medications and their side effects among key carers or home managers of adults with intellectual disabilities living in residential group homes who are prescribed such medication. The sample was 25 of the 30 adults on the caseloads of community nurses in one community learning disability team in South Wales who lived in residential services and who were prescribed anti-psychotic medication. Key carers (n = 22) or home managers (n = 3) were interviewed about their knowledge of these medications and their side effects, the source of their knowledge and their needs for training. Knowledge of potential side effects was somewhat limited. Only two were identified by the majority of respondents. Most respondents felt insufficiently informed and in need of further training. There is a role for an informed professional, such as a community nurse, to ensure that carers receive good, verbal and written information about such medications and their side effects at the time of prescription.

Journal article

The All Wales Learning Disability Strategy: current status and implications for people with current status and implications for people with mental health needs or severe challenging behaviour

Authors:
FELCE David, ALLEN David
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 1(1), March 2007, pp.33-36.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article briefly summarises the main Welsh policy principles that apply to all people with learning disabilities, including those with mental health needs or severe challenging behaviour. The authors briefly review progress in supporting people with complex behavioural needs, reflect on areas where development in practice has not lived up to policy rhetoric and also examine the consequences of this policy to practice gap. The authors then describe current barriers to further service development. Finally they suggest a number of changes that are necessary for the current inadequacies to be resolved.

Book

Learning disabilities: the fundamental facts

Authors:
EMERSON Eric, HATTON Chris, FELCE David, MURPHY Glynis
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
56p.
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev. ed.

Practical text defining providing basic facts and statistics on people with learning difficulties, concepts of learning disability, community, health needs, service provision and its costs.

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