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Journal article

Feeling down and understanding depression

Authors:
CRONIN Peter, PEYTON Liam, CHAPLIN Eddie
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 11(1), 2017, pp.2-7.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper offers the view of two people with learning disabilities lived experience of depression. The paper also offers and insight into some of the strategies they use to manage and encourage positive mental health. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Clinical psychopathology, untoward incidents and the use of restrictive procedures in adults with intellectual disability

Author:
CHAPLIN Eddie
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(2), March 2009, pp.169-178.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The authors examined all untoward incidents (n = 397) that were recorded for a group of service users (n = 65) referred to a specialist unit for adults with intellectual disability over a 6-year period. Associations between different restrictive procedures and clinical psychopathology were investigated. Physical assault was the most common incident associated with physical restraint, male gender and presence of autism. De-escalation was the most frequently employed intervention associated with less serious incidents such as verbal abuse and theft. Specific interventions seem to be associated with different types of incidents and presence of autism. The results are discussed in terms of clinical practice and possible future directions.

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Provision of mental health care for adults who have a learning disability

Authors:
HARDY Steve, CHAPLIN Eddie, WOODWARD Peter
Publisher:
Royal College of Nursing
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
44
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
3rd ed

First published in 2007, this publication provides guidance for nurses and nursing students in mental health services in delivering high-quality health care to people with learning disabilities. It continues the RCN Learning Disability Nursing Forum’s work to ensure that people with learning disabilities have equal access to high-quality health care services. It aims to provide nursing professionals with a better understanding of the mental health needs of adults with learning disabilities and of their communication needs. It highlights the vulnerability of people with learning disabilities to mental health problems, how they present, and are assessed and treated. It gives examples of good practice and partnership working. Also included is a summary of key reports and inquiries since 2006. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A comparison of carers needs for service users cared for both in and out of area

Authors:
EMERY Heidi, JONES Bridget, CHAPLIN Eddie
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 7(3), 2013, pp.143-151.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper describes an ongoing process of engagement with carers of people with intellectual disabilities currently being monitored by an out of area service for both carers of people placed both in area and out of area within a local Mental Health Learning Disabilities team in South London. Using a series of consultation events, carers were asked to participate in a free dialogue which focussed on everyday issues for carers. This included financial implications of caring, knowledge of care pathways/systems in care, carer's needs and expectations and the support they currently receive. The issues and concerns that carers face in their daily lives when supporting one or more people are highlighted. These include lack of recognition, financial difficulties, lack of training and support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Using service user and clinical opinion to develop the SAINT: a guided self-help pack for adults with intellectual disability

Authors:
CHAPLIN Eddie, CRAIG Tom, BOURAS Nick
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 6(1), 2012, pp.17-25.
Publisher:
Emerald

Despite the greater prevalence of mental ill-health in people with intellectual disabilities compared to the general population, there has been little work specifically aimed at prevention, early detection and helping this group to cope with mental health problems. This study looked at the first stage of development of a guided self-help (GSH) pack called the Self Assessment and INTervention pack (SAINT). Delphi methods and focus groups were used to gather opinions from two groups: professionals or clinical experts (n=between 15 and 33 at different stages); and service users (n=9), to inform the contents of the SAINT. The Delphi was conducted by e-mail. Results from each round were shared between the two groups to develop a consensus. Both groups were able to reach a consensus of the items that would make up the SAINT. Delphi methods combined with focus groups were able generate the contents of the SAINT and demonstrated versatility in this dual approach. The perspectives of the groups differed. The clinical experts concentrated more on severe mental health problems whereas the service users talked more about vulnerability associated with everyday life. The next step will be to establish the reliability and validity of SAINT prior to pilot testing.

Journal article

Using a simulation exercise to develop staff competence in a specialist inpatient service

Authors:
HARDY Steve, CHAPLIN Eddie
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 4(4), December 2010, pp.35-39.
Publisher:
Emerald

This case report provides a description of a simulation exercise as part of the induction programme for a staff team recruited to a specialist inpatient service for adults with intellectual disabilities and additional mental health problems. The idea of the simulation exercise was to provide a range of clinical scenarios in the physical environment in which the team would actually be working. A list of common needs of patients and other issues was developed to ensure they were included in the simulation. Professional actors were used to play the parts of the patients. The simulation exercise was held over the course of a day, and was separated into 2 shifts. A debriefing session was held immediately after both shifts had been completed, including observations from the facilitators and actors and an overview of the individual observers’ comments. This article describes the rationale for this novel approach, along with details of its planning, implementation and outcomes.

Journal article

The case for guided self-help for people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
CHAPLIN Eddie, MARSHALL-TATE Karina
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 11(3), 2017, pp.126-130.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine guided self-help (GSH), and some of the barriers as to why it is not routinely available for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). Design/methodology/approach: This paper offers an overview of GSH and the potential benefits of it as an intervention for people with ID with mild depression and/or anxiety. Findings: The current literature reports the successful use and effectiveness of GSH in the general population. However, despite this there is little evidence that it is being used in practice for people with ID. Originality/value: This paper offers an overview of GSH and advocates for its increasing use for people with ID to help bring about equality in mental healthcare. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Does substance use predict contact with the criminal justice system for people with intellectual disabilities?

Authors:
CHAPLIN Eddie, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 5(3), 2014, pp.147-153.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how substances misuse impacts on exposure to the criminal justice system for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Design/methodology/approach: An electronic case-register of mental health patients was used to examine the clinical records of 411 patients with ID. χ2 analysis was performed to test the association between variables and logistic regression to generate estimates for statistically significant association variables. Findings: Of 411 cases, 98 (23 per cent) of patient had a history of substance use, with affective disorders strongly associated with alcohol misuse χ2=4.135, df=1 (p<0.042), similarly statistically significant predictor for alcohol misuse OR: 1.7, 95 per cent CI (1.02-2.72) (p<0.043). Patients with a history of offending behaviour had three-folds higher risk to misuse drugs compared to those without a forensic conviction OR: 3.17, 95 per cent CI (1.35-7.44) (p<0.008). Those with a history of offending were more likely to have had a history of substance use. Originality/value: Substance use and its impact on offending by people with ID is still poorly understood. This paper adds new information to this under researched area. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

England and Northern Ireland policy and law update relating to mental health and intellectual disability

Authors:
CHAPLIN Eddie, TAGGART Laurence
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 6(3), 2012, pp.144-150.
Publisher:
Emerald

Two years ago this journal presented overviews and perspectives from across the UK relating to mental health and intellectual disability. This article aims to bring readers up to date with policy developments and current issues in England and Northern Ireland. As well as looking at changes to policy and legislation, the paper highlights the differences and shared concerns for people with intellectual disability living in the two countries, for example access to equitable health care. The review found that, in spite of shared visions of inclusion and equality in mental health care, there are major differences in how the countries approach these issues. This has been emphasised by recent shifts in policy. In Northern Ireland strategies are being designed to inform the delivery of evidence based services for the future while in England there has also been a move towards public protection within mental health legislation and the reaffirmation of the need to for more individualised services. It is concluded that although there is a desire for change, the reality is that the policies and legislation introduced to address issues such as accessing mental health care and service standards have still to make a significant impact to people's daily lives.

Journal article

Improving services through partnership and consultation: a case example

Authors:
CHAPLIN Eddie, et al
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 5(2), March 2011, pp.3-8.
Publisher:
Emerald

A process of monitoring and auditing care quality is integral to modern health service delivery in order to improve standards and to ensure patient safety and welfare. This paper describes how, following an audit, a specialist mental health assessment and treatment inpatient service for people with intellectual disabilities put in place a process to improve and reprovide the service in partnership with local stakeholders. Concerns were raised by an audit of training and staffing which reported a catastrophic fall in staffing and concluded that without intervention there would be a danger that the service would be unable to provide an acceptable level of service. This paper describes the response to this audit, including the temporary measures that were put in place and the development of a permanent solution. In describing the process the paper highlights the need for transparent and honest working relationships with stakeholders, along with the role of audit and monitoring of quality to determine the health and effectiveness of services. This includes evaluating the continuing need for service and maintaining an agenda driven by needs rather than beds, based on best practice.

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