Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"learning disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 33

Book Full text available online for free

The role of supported employment agencies in promoting the health of people with learning disabilities: a briefing report for Department of Health and agencies

Authors:
VIGNA Elisa, BEYER Stephen, KERR Michael
Publisher:
Welsh Centre for Learning Disabilities
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
22p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

Health promotion is particularly important for people with learning disabilities. Particular health problems faced by people with learning disabilities include obesity, smoking and alcohol use. This research examines the role of supported employment agencies (SEAs) in promoting the health of people with learning disabilities. A web survey was set up to investigate the strategies used by the UK SEAs to prevent behaviour that risks health. Fifty agencies completed the survey: 79% from England; 13% from Wales; 4% from Scotland; and 4% from Northern Ireland. The report presents the results regarding the activities of SEAs in assessing, training and providing ongoing support in relation to health and well-being promotion initiatives. Data on the agency’s awareness of the health problems people with learning disabilities face were included in the survey results. The research identified health promotion assistance agencies either delivered directly or outsourced to health professionals. The paper identifies the potential for agencies to capitalise on their role as employment mediators to promote healthy lifestyles for employees with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Supported employment for people with learning disabilities in the UK: the last 15 years

Authors:
MELLING Kathy, BEYER Stephen, KILSBY Mark
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 16(2), April 2011, pp.23-32.
Publisher:
Emerald

In the April 1997 issue of Tizard Learning Disability Review these authors wrote of their aspirations for the development of supported employment in the United Kingdom. This paper revisits these aspirations against a changing policy context with the introduction of Valuing People and Valuing People Now. It reviews developments in employment policy, innovation, the framework for funding supported employment and changes in the level of employment for people with learning disabilities since 1997. Despite significant improvements in policy, not much has changed for England in terms of the number of people with learning disabilities employed. However, there are a number of positive developments to draw on to ensure that this number increases. This article summarises the progress in this area over this 15 year period and the challenges that remain. It suggests the need for further action to deliver the Government's vision of employment inclusion and to secure the rights of people with learning disabilities to a place in the workplace.

Journal article

Barriers to using personalised technology with people with learning difficulties

Authors:
BARNARD Steve, BEYER Stephen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Assistive Technologies, 3(3), September 2009, pp.50-57.
Publisher:
Emerald

The TATE (Through Assistive Technology to Employment), project demonstrated the potential of assistive technology for people with learning difficulties; in particular a number of areas where personalised technology is appropriate. These included more accessible forms of information, more creativity in helping people to try out and use technology, increased co-ordination between personalised technology providers and social care provider staff, a greater need for an ethical framework to guide installation and delivery, greater emphasis on the impact of staff changes on client social isolation and management of workforce expectation of change due to technology. A number of case studies supported these findings. The barriers to effective use of personalised technology were found to include lack of understanding of technology among statutory and voluntary social care providers, amounting in some cases to positive resistance, funding problems in the sense of confusion as to who should fund which aspects, the ethical questions caused partly by the involvement of manufacturers of the equipment , the need for provider leadership and good practice in understanding funding streams, capital and revenue cost implications, staff roles and responsibilities, and working with and understanding other stakeholder agencies, a need for workforce training at various levels, lack of comprehensive policy (for example the UK having only recently ratified the UN Convention on Disability Rights), and lack of experience of personal budget use to provide personalised technology.

Journal article

Get a job...get a life

Authors:
KAEHNE Axel, BEYER Stephen
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, November 2009, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The authors consider the culture shift needed to get people with learning disabilities into the labour market. A specific government pilot 'The Getting a Life programme' is briefly described. The programme mainly targets young people in education and aims to change attitudes of stakeholders and create partnerships.

Journal article

Generation gap

Authors:
KAEHNE Axel, BEYER Stephen
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 9(3), May 2009, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The results of a study looking at what works when it comes to transition to employment for young people with learning disabilities are presented. The study looked at five aspects of transition support, including what models of employment transition planning currently operate; what transitional planning leads to young people gaining and keeping employment; what ensures effective involvement of young people, their families and relevant agencies; what agency partnerships are essential; and what changes in central and local government policy are needed to improve transition pathways to employment.

Journal article

The impact on objective technology of life outcomes of assistive technology in residential services for people with learning disabilities

Authors:
PERRY Jonathan, BEYER Stephen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Assistive Technologies, 3(1), March 2009, pp.5-14.
Publisher:
Emerald

The UK government is committed to preventative technologies and increasingly they are being incorporated into residential services for people with learning disabilities. This paper describes an evaluation of a sample of settings in which various assistive technology (AT) devices have been installed following the assessment of individual residents' needs. The impact of this on residents' objective quality of life was assessed using a range of quantitative measures and through some qualitative questions. Despite some positive consequences of the AT being reported by staff in response to the qualitative items, there was no significant impact on any of the quantitative measures. In isolation, AT does not appear to be sufficient to significantly improve objective quality of life outcomes for people with learning disabilities in residential services. Equally, AT does not appear to reduce objective quality of life outcomes. The challenge to service providers is to ensure that the introduction of AT and any associated change to staffing levels or support procedures translates into improvements in residents' overall quality of life. To detect such improvements future research might have to broaden the range of quantitative methods used and supplement them with qualitative techniques.

Book Full text available online for free

A guide to implementing assistive technology for people with learning disabilities

Authors:
BEYER Stephen, PERRY Jonathan, MEEK Andrea
Publisher:
Home Farm Trust
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
50p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

This handbook has been produced for for organisations and families who wish to implement person centred technology. The guide expertly lays out the case for assistive technology and telecare, putting it in context - how and why it should exist alongside existing services - and provides a clear guide to implementation.

Journal article

Supported employment in Britain

Authors:
BEYER Stephen, KILSBY Mark
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 2(2), April 1997, pp.6-14.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper describes supported employment, its growth as an alternative day services and research which indicates potentially beneficial outcomes in the areas of increased employee income, social integration, satisfaction engagement in activity, employer satisfaction, and in the relationship between financial costs and savings.

Journal article

What do ATCs offer in Wales? A survey of Welsh day services

Authors:
BEYER Stephen, KILSBY Mark, LOWE Kathy
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 7(1), 1994, pp.16-40.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Reports the findings of a survey of the organisation and activities offered by all adult training centres in Wales, carried out in 1990.

Journal article

The implementation of the All-Wales Mental Handicap Strategy

Authors:
BEYER Stephen, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 4(2), 1991, pp.115-140.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Describes the way the Welsh Office has revised mechanisms for the implementation of the All-Wales Mental Handicap Strategy in its first five years, and the changes in service provision achieved between 1983 and 1988.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts