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Journal article

Developments in deinstitutionalization and community living in the Czech Republic

Authors:
ŠIŠKA Jan, BEADLE-BROWN Julie
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 8(2), June 2011, pp.125-133.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article considers the progress towards the development of community-based services and full social inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities in the Czech Republic. It summarises progress over the past 2 decades in the Czech Republic in moving from an institutional era toward one that values community-based alternatives. Particular attention is paid to issues such as choice and control, individual funding as a means towards social inclusion, and the matter of human rights. While European and national policy is supportive of community living, and new individualised funding streams have been created, progress in the Czech Republic toward the goal of community living for everyone with a disability has been slow and has met with many barriers. The article highlights the need to consider issues such as the availability of data related to funding and delivery of services, planning of the transitional period toward community-based services, accessibility of reports on quality of services (including institutions), and the conflict of interests created by the system of guardianship. It concludes that, despite economic circumstances that may slow down the process of deinstitutionalisation, the direction of change toward community living needs to be sustained.

Journal article

Adult protection of people with intellectual disabilities: incidence, nature and responses

Authors:
BEADLE-BROWN Julie, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 23(6), November 2010, pp.573-584.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper presents findings from the analysis of the 1,926 referrals relating to people with intellectual disabilities included description of the nature of abuse and the responses to the referrals. Findings indicated that about one-third of all adult protection referrals related to people with intellectual disability, remaining consistent over time. However, the number of referrals increased significantly. The majority of people lived in residential care or supported living and this was reflected in the nature of the referrals – people were more likely to have been abused in the care home and by staff or service users than those without an intellectual disability. The most common type of abuse was physical abuse. Sexual abuse was more prevalent in the intellectual disability sample. People with intellectual disability were more likely to have experienced follow-up action, usually through more monitoring. There was a different pattern of abuse seen in those placed out-of-area. The authors conclude that there is some indication that residential situation and in particular being placed in a residential placement out-of-area may be an important factor in predicting adult protection referrals.

Book Full text available online for free

Too far to go?: people with learning disabilities placed out-of-area

Authors:
BEADLE-BROWN Julie, et al
Publisher:
Tizard Centre
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
72p.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

Researchers have discovered that a substantial number of people with learning disabilities are placed in residential homes in Kent from other authorities. The study, the first to evaluate this kind of data, set out to discover why this is, and the effect of these placements on the individuals and their families.

Journal article

Individual planning: an exploration of the link between quality of plan and quality of life

Authors:
ADAMS Lynn, MANSELL Jim, BEADLE-BROWN Julie
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 34(2), June 2006, pp.68-76.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

In this study individual plans for people with intellectual disabilities were evaluated for quality and effectiveness in improving quality of life. Quality was assessed by rating whether goals were relevant, observable, age appropriate, necessary, timetabled, developmental, measurable, realistic, assigned to staff and improving at least one of O'Brien's five service accomplishments. Effectiveness was assessed by examining quality of life outcomes for participants with and without individual plans rated as higher quality. No significant difference in outcomes associated with having a higher quality individual plan was found. Findings present a challenge to current expectations that presence and quality of individual plan goals are associated with improved outcomes. Written individual plan goals may not be directly correlated with actual practice, and further research is required to examine this.

Journal article

Grouping people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour in residential care

Authors:
MANSELL Jim, BEADLE-BROWN Julie
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 9(2), April 2004, pp.4-10.
Publisher:
Emerald

Grouping people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour in residential care has been the focus of several recent research studies. Describes these studies and what they found. In general they found negative effects of grouping people with challenging behaviour together in terms of the quality of staff interaction with them and the outcomes they experience.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Conundrums of supported living: the experiences of people with intellectual disability

Authors:
BIGBY Christine, BOULD Emma, BEADLE-BROWN Julie
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 42(4), 2017, pp.309-319.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Background: Dissatisfaction with the inflexibility of the group home model has led to the growth of supported living that separates housing from support and is thought to have greater potential for better quality of life outcomes. Comparative studies have had mixed findings with some showing few differences, other than greater choice in supported living. By investigating service user experiences of supported living this study aimed to identify how the potential of supported living might be better realised. Method:Thirty-four people with intellectual disability participated in 7 focus group interviews and 6 people in an individual interview. Data were analysed using grounded theory methods. Results: Although participants experienced greater choice and control over their everyday lives, they did not feel they controlled the way support was provided and experienced restrictions on lifestyle associated with low income. Despite their use of community places and varied social connections to family, friends, and acquaintances, most experienced loneliness. Conclusions: If the potential of supported living is to be realised, shortcomings of support arrangements must be addressed by, for example, greater consistency of support worker skills, consumer control over recruitment and rostering, and more skilled support to build friendships and manage difficult relationships. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Implementation of active support in Victoria, Australia: an exploratory study

Authors:
MANSELL Jim, BEADLE-BROWN Julie, BIGBY Christine
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 38(1), 2013, pp.48-58.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Active support is an effective intervention to support engagement of residents with intellectual disability in group homes. This survey explored resident characteristics of the people supported by organisations implementing active support, the provision of active support, its procedures and systems, and resident engagement in meaningful activity and relationships. Information was collected through questionnaires and direct observation of 33 group homes from 6 organisations in Victoria, Australia, with a 5–10-year history of implementing active support. Residents with lower support needs were engaged with little staff contact or assistance. Use of active support systems and structures was mixed. Only one organisation consistently provided good active support. Administrative systems and structures are not sufficient to change staff interaction and thus resident experience. Shared supported accommodation services may represent an inefficient use of resources for more able residents, as staff resources are not maximised to support for resident engagement. (Publisher abstract)

Book

Active support: enabling and empowering people with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
MANSELL Jim, BEADLE-BROWN Julie
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
240p.
Place of publication:
London

Active Support is a proven model of care that enables and empowers people with intellectual disabilities to participate fully in all aspects of their lives. This book provide a comprehensive overview of Active Support and how it can be used in practice, based on the theory and research underpinning the methods involved. It describes how to engage people with intellectual disabilities in meaningful activity as active participants, and looks at the communication style needed to foster positive relationships between carers and the people they are supporting. Highlighting the main issues for those trying to put Active Support into practice, the book explains what is needed on a day-to-day basis to support the implementation, improvement and maintenance of the approach, along with possible solutions for the difficulties they may encounter. Finally, it examines how to integrate Active Support with other person-centred approaches, drawing on examples from various organisations and individual case studies. This book is designed for anyone professionally concerned with the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities, including psychologists, behaviour specialists, social workers, care managers, occupational therapists and inspectors and regulators of services.

Book Full text available online for free

Deinstitutionalization and community living: outcomes and costs: report of a European study: volume 3: country reports

Editors:
BEADLE-BROWN Julie, KOZMA Agnes, (eds.)
Publisher:
University of Kent. Tizard Centre
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
599p.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

These country reports form the third volume of the final report from the European Union Project Deinstitutionalisation and community living – outcomes and costs: report of a European Study. There are 28 country reports included. The aim of each report is three-fold: to summarise the data collated for the template for each of the service types identified for that country; to comment on the completeness and adequacy of the data collated; to provide a commentary on the context and current situation for people with disabilities in each country. In order to analyse, summarise and compare data across countries, information received on each template was recorded into categories. It is these categories which are included in the data summaries at the beginning of each of the country reports.

Book Full text available online for free

A valued life: developing person-centred approaches so people can be more included

Authors:
ASHMAN Bev, BEADLE-BROWN Julie
Publisher:
United Response
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
London

This report describes a project by United Response in partnership with the Tizard Centre at the University of Kent to evaluate the impact that person-centred approaches are having on the lives of people with learning disabilities. This extensive observational study looked at the needs and characteristics of people supported by United Response, looking at the extent to which these people engaged in meaningful activities and social interaction. Baseline assessment was carried out in 1999/2000 with observations made of 343 people with learning disabilities living in 76 residential and supported living services in England. Reassessment was made in 2005/2006 with trained assessors visiting 138 services, where they observed 469 people being supported in their own homes. Questionnaires were also completed by 425 staff, and information collected on 649 people with learning disabilities. The results show that person-centred approaches have resulted in the people supported by United Response being significantly more engaged in everyday activities, with the greatest change being seen among people with the most complex needs. In 2000, 35% of people were largely disengaged; this reduced to 14% in 2005/2006. The number of people engaged for more than 50% of the time increased from 13% to 31%.

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