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Book

Residential Care Review: literature survey: mental handicap

Author:
ATKINSON Dorothy
Publisher:
National Institute for Social Work
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
38p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Research as social work: participatory research in learning disability

Author:
ATKINSON Dorothy
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 35(4), June 2005, pp.425-434.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

The social-work literature has already made links between social work and research, and has argued in favour of practitioner–research. This paper turns the argument around and looks at how research can come to look and feel like social work. This happens particularly, but not exclusively, in participatory research in the learning-disability field, especially in auto/biographical or life-story research, where long-term research relationships are more in evidence. Drawing on the participatory research methodology literature, and her own oral and life-history research, the author explores the areas in which research comes to emulate social-work practice. There are, of course, practical and ethical issues to be addressed and, as the author concludes, safeguards are needed to clarify roles and foster openness in research relationships.

Journal article

Research and empowerment: involving people with learning difficulties in oral and life history research

Author:
ATKINSON Dorothy
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(7), December 2004, pp.691-702.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper takes as its central theme the argument that inclusive learning disability research has the potential to be empowering for the people involved. It draws from 2 oral and life history research projects to explore the multiple uses of story-telling and the multi-layered picture of learning disability history that emerged. People with learning difficulties were involved in all stages of the research process, contributing their stories as oral and life historians but also co-researching written records in a bid to know and understand more about their own and other people's past lives. The research enabled participants not only to tell their stories but also to reflect on them, to develop new insights into their meaning and to see them in a wider social and political context.

Journal article

Using autobiographical approaches with people with learning difficulties

Authors:
ATKINSON Dorothy, WALMSLEY Jan
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 14(2), March 1999, pp.203-216.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Biography and autobiography have been used in numerous ways to represent people with learning difficulties. This article reviews a variety of approaches to biography and autobiography with people with learning difficulties, and discusses the roles researchers play. Ends with a discussion of the potential of autobiography as a means to change the power relationships in disability research.

Book

A part of community: social integration and neighbourhood networks

Authors:
ATKINSON Dorothy, WARD Linda
Publisher:
Campaign for People with Mental Handicap
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
11p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Life history work with a group of people with learning disabilities

Author:
ATKINSON Dorothy
Journal article citation:
Groupwork, 6(3), 1993, pp.199-210.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

Describes and analyses a life history project with a group of older people with learning disabilities.

Journal article

Research interviews with people with mental handicaps

Author:
ATKINSON Dorothy
Journal article citation:
Mental Handicap Research, 1(1), January 1988, pp.75-90.
Publisher:
BIMH Publications

Looks at the growing body of literature on the challenges faced by researchers who seek the viewpoint of consumers, and describes the research methods used in a follow-up study of people with mental handicaps living in the community, in which personal views were sought. Describes the challenges met at the design stage and during the research interviews.

Journal article

An oral history of the ethics of institutional closure

Authors:
INGHAM Nigel, ATKINSON Dorothy
Journal article citation:
Ethics and Social Welfare, 7(3), 2013, pp.241-256.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Abingdon

This paper examines the ethical dimensions of the closure process of an English large long-stay institution for people with learning difficulties, Royal Albert Hosptial, during the last quarter of the twentieth century. It does this primarily through an analysis of oral historical interview data stemming from those managers who implemented rundown. The paper illustrates the ways in which their testimonies indicate the presence of a morally infused dominant rhetoric, which was based upon the therapeutic benefits of closure, informed by the ideas of normalisation and social role valorisation. However, the paper argues that this principled managerial perspective had unfortunate ethical consequences, in that it under-acknowledged, marginalised and discredited staff viewpoints which raised pertinent issues relating to the downsizing of this particular hospital. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Written out of history: invisible women in intellectual disability social work

Authors:
BIGBY Christine, ATKINSON Dorothy
Journal article citation:
Australian Social Work, 63(1), March 2010, pp.4-17.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The area of intellectual disability is an important field of social work practice in both Britain and Australia. Yet this is also a multidisciplinary field in which the role of social workers, particularly women, in contributing to the lives of people with intellectual disability and their families has largely gone unnoticed. Focusing on England and Victoria, Australia in particular, this paper uses oral history interviews with 3 long-standing social workers, and documentary evidence including government reports and newspaper coverage, to explore the similarity in the roles of social workers in intellectual disability. It covers the period between the beginning of social work in this field, which in the case of England was 1929 and in Victoria 1952, until the end of the 1990s. Work with families is identified as being central in both countries, as well as mediating relationship between institutions and services, families, and the community, and service development and advocacy. The paper concludes by asking questions about the disappearance of identified social work positions in this field and how their previous roles are fulfilled.

Book

Good times, bad times: women with learning difficulties telling their stories

Editors:
ATKINSON Dorothy, et al, (eds.)
Publisher:
British Institute of Learning Disabilities
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
243p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Kidderminster

Women with a learning disability give voice to their thoughts and feelings on the topics which matter to them most, including relationships, children and work. The book also records the way in which women with and without learning disability worked side by side to make their voices heard. The book includes an illustrated accessible version.

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