Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Publisher:"social services research group"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 520

Journal article Full text available online for free

Role theory and family values: a conceptual framework for family and social work reciprocation

Authors:
RAPAPROT Joan, BAIANI Poirier
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 32(3), 2016/17, pp.169-182.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

This article has two main parts. The first focuses on the theoretical and sociopolitical context surrounding the legal category of the nearest relative in England under the Mental Health Act 1983. It provides a brief overview of a study of the role’s functioning and the theoretical development of Reciprocal Role Valorization. The second concentrates on the Family Group Conference, its innovative developments in the New Brunswick, Canada and how the theory arising out of the nearest relative study relates to the province’s initiative. The importance of specialist postqualifying professional development and professional maturity to enable social workers to unlock family potential is also argued in the context of increasing interest in strengths based social work. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

A blue print for a person centred system of assessment and support planning

Author:
SALSBERG Colin
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 32(3), 2016/17, pp.151-167.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

This paper describes the results of a two year collaboration between the author, acting in a consultancy role, and an English council that wanted to personalise its mainstream assessment and support planning system for adults. Convinced of the importance of personalisation for both ethical and pragmatic reasons, but not the accepted strategies to achieve it, the council sought a new approach. The project involved intensive work with all interests, bringing together ideas from published material with the local experience of service users, carers, practitioners, finance, IT and legal colleagues to arrive at a practical agenda for change. The starting premise was that resource led practice was the source of depersonalised supports, and that such practice was the inevitable consequence of the policy environment within which practice takes place. A new environment would have to be created. The council ultimately resolved not to implement a key element of the new environment which was particularly sensitive in legal and political terms. However, this was not before a comprehensive, deliverable ‘blue print’ for a person centred system was developed. The blue print is offered as a contribution to the search for a sustainable future for social care. This article outlines its development and provisions. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Building on the recovery approach: the development of a conceptual model of service design for carers in mental health

Author:
FOX Joanna
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 32(3), 2016/17, pp.183-196.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

Carers’ views about their role in recovery are under-researched, and studies investigating their needs are underdeveloped. In this study, participatory action research was used; the researcher was supported by a steering group of eight stakeholders to co-produce a training programme on recovery and data collection methods to explore the meaning of recovery for carers. The programme was delivered by the researcher, an expert-by-experience with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, and a carer of her son with a similar diagnosis, to a group of eleven participants. Mainly qualitative data was collected together with supplementary quantitative socio-demographic data from the participants. Selected findings based on the carers’ discussions are presented which focus on how the relationship between carers and professionals can most effectively facilitate service user recovery. Issues of information exchange between carers and professionals and the impact of patient confidentiality are highlighted, the nature of recovery practice is considered, and the participants’ need to be regarded as ‘experts’ is addressed. A conceptual model of service design based on a recovery-oriented ‘triangle of care’ is presented. The potential implementation of this model in the current UK mental health service context is considered with the need for co-production between all stakeholders to ensure its development. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Factors that influence decision making by 8-12 year olds in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS): a systematic review

Authors:
COX Annette, et al
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 31(3), 2016, pp.195-209.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

There is significant legal guidance and case law available to support clinicians in assessing whether young people aged over 13 years are able to make informed decisions about their own healthcare; however when working with children aged 8-12 years, the guidance is unclear. In order to assess whether 8-12 year olds are able to make decisions in their own healthcare, we first need to understand the factors that influence this process. A systematic literature review of five electronic databases (PsycINFO, EBSCO, Science Direct, Science Full Text, Web of Science All Databases) was conducted. The search identified 12 studies and one piece of government guidance. The studies were identified from a variety of health and social research journals. The six factors that were identified were: 1) consent, competence and capacity, 2) best interests, 3) communication, 4) risks and conflicts, 5) legal frameworks, and, 6) parental role. The review concludes that it is possible for some children 8-12 years of age to make decisions regarding their own healthcare. The necessary conditions are that age specific language is used through a variety of mediums which will include risks, benefits and options for the proposed interventions. Clinicians need to be skilled in the assessment of the child’s ability to make decisions and be effective communicators with a commitment to children’s involvement. Further research in both these areas is needed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Self-funders and social care: findings from a scoping review

Author:
BAXTER Kate
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 31(3), 2016, pp.179-193.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

This paper draws on a scoping review of the evidence base about adults in England who purchase social care services and support using their own money. It presents a selection of the review’s findings relevant to self-funders and key aspects of the Care Act 2014. The review covers the years 2000 to 2015. Searches of electronic databases were complemented by a focused search of the websites of key organisations. After applying inclusion/exclusion criteria, and removing duplicates, details were extracted from 76 references. The majority focused on residential care (33), domiciliary care (12), or both (23). Studies used a range of research methods. The overall numbers and percentages of self-funders of home care and care home places have increased. There are variations across regions but limited evidence about demographic or socio-economic characteristics of self-funders. Self-funders feel they lack advice from local authorities; local authorities have limited knowledge of self-funders in their areas. People struggle to understand fees and the financial implications of long-term care. Providers are beginning to realise the potential of the self-funding market but full use is not yet being made of e-marketplaces. Key gaps in knowledge remain at a time when the number and importance of self-funders is increasing. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

The Care Act 2014, personalisation and the new eligibility regulations: implications for homeless people

Authors:
CORNES Michelle, et al
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 31(3), 2016, pp.211-223.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

This paper explores the implications of the Care Act 2014 for ‘homeless people, a group that was defined as ‘ineligible’ for publically funded care and support under the previous community care legislation. The paper describes how the Supporting People Programme evolved to fill this gap, providing what was termed ‘housing related support’ to meet the needs of homeless people and other excluded groups. It then describes how the austerity measures have eroded this support, and the evidence for a retrenchment of the welfare state. The second part of the paper explores the changes that have been introduced as a result of the Care Act 2014 and in what circumstances they might be used to access personalised support for ‘homeless people’ (including housing related support). It draws highlights evidence that necessitates a reconceptualisation of homelessness as a ‘health risk’ that extends beyond the low level preventative agenda making the case that many ‘homeless people’ will now fulfil the new eligibility criteria for publically funded care and support. It also highlights the barriers which may hinder awareness raising and the implementation of these changes thereby limiting opportunities to enhance choice and control for some of the most severely and multiply disadvantaged people in England. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Quality of life measures for carers for people with dementia: measurement issues, gaps in research and promising paths

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, BOWLING Ann
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 31(3), 2016, pp.163-178.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

Background: Providing support to a family member with dementia often comes at a cost to the quality of life (QoL) of the carer (caregiver), giving rise to current and future unmet needs for health and social care and support themselves. These have important implications for cost effective health and social care support services and pathways. This article summarises the findings of a scoping review of the literature on QoL measures for carers of people with dementia that was commissioned by the Medical Research Council to address what is ‘state of the art’ in measurement and identification, any gaps in the evidence base, and challenges for further research. Method: a scope of the literature using Medline and Psychlit (all years) as these are particularly relevant to health psychology was undertaken in March 2013, using combinations of the following keywords: quality of life, measure, scale, caregiver (including carer), chronic illness (the term long-term condition is generally captured under this phrase), dementia, cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease. Results: there is a dearth of carer-reported QoL measures, in contrast to the existence of proxy scales for carers which are used to measure the patient’s/client’s QoL (prevalent in relation to dementia). Several methodological challenges were identified. Conclusion: caring for people with dementia often has both negative and positive consequences which need inclusion in measures but these may vary by individual and over time. The lack of consensus about what to measure and how in QoL of carers of people with dementia does not help practitioners or service funders. Measures need to be appropriate for younger and older carers, type of carer and caring tasks, and be sensitive to cultural and sociodemographic differences. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Addressing negative attitudes, developing knowledge: the design and evaluation of a bespoke substance misuse module

Authors:
HARLING Martyn, et al
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 32(3), 2016/17, pp.137-149.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

Recent calls for the inclusion of substance misuse into social work curricula appear to have been met with a piecemeal and rather sporadic approach from many Higher Education establishments. This research set out to determine if a bespoke module, delivered to a group of social work students (n=57), might influence their attitudes and values towards substance misuse and working with substance misusers. A mixed methods approach was used, employing an attitudinal Likert scale and a series of semi-structured interviews (n=10). Analysis of the quantitative data indicated that there was no significant change in the students’ established attitudes over the course of the module, but there was a substantial increase in the number of students (35%) who agreed with the Likert statement ‘working with drug users is a rewarding role’. The qualitative element of the research suggested that students felt more prepared for working with substance misusers and had increased their level of substance misuse knowledge since starting training. Whilst it is prudent to remain cautious when reporting the findings of a small scale research study, the results of the study support the effectiveness of the bespoke module in preparing the students to work with substance users/misusers (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Home care services for older people: findings from a national survey of social care commissioners

Authors:
HUGHES Jane, CHESTER Helen, CHALLIS David
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 30(1), 2013, pp.51-64.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

This paper explores local authority commissioning and contracting arrangements for home care, staff training opportunities and the range of services provided for older people utilising data from a national postal survey with a 74 per cent response rate. Local authority provision focused on intermediate care services. Joint commissioning of this with health was common but less likely for specialist mental health services. Most home care was commissioned from and provided by independent sector providers with contractual requirements identified as a means of influencing and monitoring training opportunities. A range of services were provided for users, additional to personal care. Local authority training was sometimes available to independent providers, focused on statutory requirements rather than user needs. Implications for the development of high quality services are discussed in terms of user need, service flexibility and training for staff providing direct care. It is suggested that within the commissioning process key drivers of the development of more personalised high quality home care services are: regular dialogue with service providers; greater health and social care involvement in a joint commissioning process; alignment of contracting arrangements to reflect service outcomes; and specification of training requirements within the setting and monitoring of home care contracts. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Active ageing through wellbeing: the role of information in ‘that little bit of help’

Authors:
DAVIS Howard, RITTERS Katrina
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 30(1), 2013, pp.23-35.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

Information and the ability to act on it are seen as vital parts of the choice and personalisation agendas in health and social care. This is particularly important as older people are encouraged to do more for themselves in an era of budget reductions. The right information given at the right time can give access to that ‘little bit of help’, first described by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (2005), to help keep people independent and out of health and care systems for longer. Understanding how, where and why people access services and information is therefore key to developing supportive policies for an ageing society. This paper describes some of the literature and focuses on two projects aimed at widening access and improving information. LinkAge Plus was a £10million government funded project, trialling a variety of different approaches to widening access. The Stratford-upon-Avon Early Intervention Project trialled a digitised self-assessment process for wellbeing linked to local sources of help. This paper stresses the importance of social networks and describes how outreach work in Tower Hamlets, one of the LinkAge plus pilots, was working to improve these. (Publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts