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Community care and mental health services for adults with sensory impairment in Scotland: research publication

Authors:
SKELLINGTON ORR Kate, et al
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
110p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This paper outlines the key findings from a study which examined the community care and mental health needs of, and current service provision for, sensory impaired adults in Scotland. The study involved a literature review, a mapping exercise of existing services, and consultation with service planners and providers and with service users and their carers. The research focussed on Deaf, deafened, blind, partially sighted and dual sensory impaired adults. Across sensory impairment categories, the main community care needs identified were rehabilitation, mobility, communication, benefits and services, accessibility and social inclusion. The research literature suggests that sensory impaired adults are at higher risk of social exclusion and isolation than other members of the community, which can impact on mental health. Other factors combine making mental health needs complex among sensory impaired adults. Across sensory impairment categories, specific areas of unmet need included a lack of social work contact, particularly an on-going relationship with an individual social worker; a lack of pro-active dissemination of information regarding services and entitlements, and a lack of joint working between health professionals and social work services.

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Connecting partnerships: a framework for supporting leadership, effective management and service innovations across health and social care partnerships

Author:
JOINT IMPROVEMENT TEAM
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

A framework is provided for the Joint Improvement Team (JIT) Connecting Partnership Programme. The (JIT) was established in 2005 to work directly with health and social care partnerships to accelerate the pace of improvements to ensure better outcomes for service users and carers. The JIT is sponsored by the Scottish Executive, the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (CoSLA), and NHS Scotland and aims to help partnerships work towards both national and local improvement targets. The JIT Connecting Partnership Programme provides an opportunity to provide additional support and advice to Partnerships involved with the JIT Intensive Support Programme by developing a more structured link with one or more other Partnerships. It provides an approach to facilitate effective sharing of experience, skills and good practice It will also provide mentoring and ‘peer support’ to individuals. The Programme involves identification of key objectives based on the joint action plan between the JIT and the Partnership, supporting shared learning and benchmarking opportunities. There is the potential to develop links with an academic department to further support personal development and support.

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Improving the quality of life for people with learning disabilities: research into practice: conference report

Author:
JOINT IMPROVEMENT TEAM
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report summarises the presentations and discussions at a conference which focused on effective approaches in planning, commissioning and provision of services for people with learning disabilities. The main aim of the conference was to provide up-to-date evidence based on information relevant to health and social care services, and to contribute to developing a framework to support implementation of the research-based information through practice guidelines for health and social care services in this area. The report provides main points from papers presented and workshop discussions. The papers covered: supported accommodation for people with learning disabilities, community living and how well staff match people's needs, adult protection and the vulnerabilities of people with intellectual disabilities, and the impact of ageing on people with a learning disability. The report draws conclusions, and sets out key questions from the conference and next steps.

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Exploring a managed care network approach to support Lanarkshire Partnerships delivering services for older people: conference report

Author:
JOINT IMPROVEMENT TEAM
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
23p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The report provides an overview of the conference ‘Exploring a Managed Care Network Approach to Support Lanarkshire Partnerships Delivering Services for Older People’. This conference was co-hosted by the Joint Improvement Team (JIT) and by Lanarkshire Health and Care Partnerships in April 2006 at Bell College , Hamilton. The objective of the conference was to explore, with a range of stakeholders, the potential for a managed care network approach to support Lanarkshire partnerships to deliver a better experience and improved outcomes for older people who use services and their carers. The conference also aimed: to connect partnerships to provide an opportunity for shared learning; to highlight shared challenges and opportunities; to explore potential areas of collaborative advantage; and to build capacity through collaboration with regional and national resources. This conference report includes key themes from the presentations and workshops, conclusions, and plans for a development programme to further scope the potential for a managed care network for older people.

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Residential care and education: improving practice in residential special schools and secure care accommodation services in Scotland

Authors:
CARE COMMISSION, HM INSPECTORATE OF EDUCATION
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
100p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Intended as a staff development guide to support the evaluation of quality across care and education, the aim of this guide (developed by a working group which included senior managers from residential special schools and secure care accommodation, with representatives from Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education and the Care Commission) is to provide practical support for evaluating and improving the quality of provision made for children and young people and to promote excellence in residential schools and secure care services. It draws on best practice in monitoring and evaluating across different sectors of education and on best practice in residential special schools and secure care accommodation, aiming to highlight effective ways in which services can fully support vulnerable children and young people. It covers sources of advice and legislation, self-evaluation in the context of residential special school and secure care accommodation services, the framework for self-evaluation and gathering the evidence, and includes case studies and a toolkit entitled Aiming high through developing a culture of reflection within your service. It builds on advice given in the third edition of How good is our school?, and is intended to be read in conjunction with that.

Book

Residential care and education: improving practice in residential special schools in Scotland

Author:
CARE COMMISSION. HM INSPECTORATE OF EDUCATION
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
31p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The first national review of school care accommodation services inspected jointly by the Care Commission and HM Inspectorate of Education, this report is based on the first round of inspections undertaken in 2002-04 of all of Scotland's residential schools which came within the Regulation of Care (Scotland) Act 2001, and aims to help schools to take forward improvements by describing good practice. Schools were asked to undertake self-evaluation as a starting point, inspection teams listened to the views of children and young people, gathered parental views through questionnaires, and gave feedback to school senior management and other relevant staff about the evaluations, key strengths, and main points for action from the inspection; reports on all of the inspections were published. This report looks at maintaining positive environments for safety, support and education, creating a climate to ensure pupils' care and protection, working together to meet pupils' needs, promoting pupils' learning and the curriculum, and leadership, management and planning to improve provision. It describes good practice, identifies weaknesses and improvements needed, and sets out points for action.

Book Full text available online for free

Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2000
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Information about The Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000, which provides ways to manage the financial and welfare affairs of people who are unable to manage them for themselves. Suitable for professionals and lay people.

Book Full text available online for free

Delivering a healthy future: an action framework for children and young people's health in Scotland: a draft for consultation

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
78p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

My turn to talk? the participation of looked after and accommodated children in decision-making concerning their care: full report

Author:
CHILDREN IN SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
82p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Successful participation in decision-making can be particularly hard for looked after and accommodated children (as well as for the professionals and adult decision-makers in their lives). This qualitative research study was undertaken to ascertain the meaning and manifestations of 'children’s participation in decision-making' in two Scottish local authorities (one urban, one rural). In-depth interviews were conducted with looked after children, social workers, reviewing officers and children’s rights officers. This work focuses on the feelings and views of looked after and accommodated children and considers of both day-to-day participation in decision making and participation in formal meetings about placement, parental contact and other major issues in the lives of these children. It also includes the perceptions of the key professionals working with these children. This study’s aims were to explore looked after children’s views on, and experiences of, participation in meetings and more generally, to identify methods used to help looked after children have input and assess how well these methods work according to key stakeholders, and make recommendations on ways to help children have input into decision-making concerning their care.

Book Full text available online for free

Scotland’s national programme for improving mental health and well-being small research projects initiative 2005-06: implementing a recovery approach in policy and practice: a review of the literature

Author:
BERZINS Kathryn M.
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
47p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This literature review examines some of the international literature to date that looks at implementing recovery-orientated policy and practice through evaluation of service delivery. It highlights both the policy and practice contexts of initiatives, and their relevance to the Scottish context. It identifies lessons that may be learnt from the international evidence and makes recommendations about where this evidence may be used as a basis for Scottish policy and service development. This review has been carried out in liaison with the Scottish Recovery Network in line with their research agenda.

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