Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Publisher:"sage"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 9061

Book

Treating secondary victims: intervention with the non-offending mother in the incest family

Author:
STRAND Virginia C.
Publisher:
Sage,|Sage
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
262p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Thousand Oaks, CA

Uses case studies to outline a treatment model for psychotherapy with nonoffending mothers in incest families. Contains chapters on: understanding the impact of incest on the nonoffending mother; gender and countertransference; contextual considerations in the engagement of the mother (including multicultural issues); evaluating the mother and planning for treatment; individual treatment; group treatment; family treatment; case coordination; and working with mothers involved in custody and visitation disputes.

Journal article

Childhood sexual abuse in adolescents adjudicated for sexual offenses: mental health consequences and sexual offending behaviors

Authors:
MORAIS Hugo B., et al
Journal article citation:
Sexual Abuse a Journal of Research and Treatment, 30(1), 2018, pp.23-42.
Publisher:
Sage

The current study examined the effects of child sexua abuse (CSA) on 498 male adolescents adjudicated for sexual offences who represent the small portion of CSA survivors who engage in sexual offences. The prevalence of internalising symptoms, parental attachment difficulties, specific sexual offending behaviours, and risk for sexually offending were compared among participants with and without a history of CSA. Results indicated that participants with a history of CSA were more likely to be diagnosed with major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder than those who did not report a history of CSA. A history of CSA was also positively correlated with risk for sexually offending and with specific offense patterns and consensual sexual behaviours. No significant differences emerged on parental attachment difficulties. These results highlight that adolescents adjudicated for sexual offences with a history of CSA present with differences in sexual and psychological functioning as well as markedly different offending patterns when compared with those without a CSA history. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Predicting parent-child aggression risk: cognitive factors and their interaction with anger

Author:
RODRIGUEZ Christina M.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 33(3), 2018, pp.359-378.
Publisher:
Sage

Several cognitive elements have previously been proposed to elevate risk for physical child abuse. To predict parent–child aggression risk, the current study evaluated the role of approval of parent–child aggression, perceptions of children as poorly behaved, and discipline attributions. Several dimensions of attributions specifically tied to parents’ discipline practices were targeted. In addition, anger experienced during discipline episodes was considered a potential moderator of these cognitive processes. Using a largely multiple-indicator approach, a sample of 110 mothers reported on these cognitive and affective aspects that may occur when disciplining their children as well as responding to measures of parent–child aggression risk. Findings suggest that greater approval of parent–child aggression, negative perceptions of their child’s behaviour, and discipline attributions independently predicted parent–child aggression risk, with anger significantly interacting with mothers’ perception of their child as more poorly behaved to exacerbate their parent–child aggression risk. Of the discipline attribution dimensions evaluated, mothers’ sense of external locus of control and believing their child deserved their discipline were related to increase parent–child aggression risk. Future work is encouraged to comprehensively evaluate how cognitive and affective components contribute and interact to increase risk for parent–child aggression. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Frequency, nature, and correlates of hate crime victimization: experiences in an urban sample of lesbian, gay, and bisexual community members

Authors:
BURKS Alixandra C., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 33(3), 2018, pp.402-420.
Publisher:
Sage

The present study examines two central research questions. First, the authors sought to add to current knowledge on the frequency and types of hate crime experiences in an urban sample. Also, drawing on existing frameworks for sexual minority specific (SMS) stress, the authors examined internalised SMS stress (defined by internalised homophobia and acceptance concerns regarding one’s minority status) as a mediator of the association between hate crime victimisation (i.e., objective or social SMS stress) and mental health symptoms (i.e., symptoms of depression, anxiety, and general stress). Participants were 336 self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) community members who elected to participate in research at a community health agency in an urban southwestern United States jurisdiction. Results suggested (a) approximately one third of the sample reported lifetime hate crime victimisation, with the most common types characterised by interpersonal, as opposed to property, crimes; (b) approximately half of participants reported their most recent victimisation to law enforcement; and (c) internalised SMS stress mediated the relation between hate crime victimisation and overall mental health symptoms. Findings are discussed with respect to implications of the unique nature of hate crimes in an urban setting, as well as theoretical and practical implications of SMS stress findings. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Circumstances preceding homicide-suicides involving child victims: a qualitative analysis

Authors:
HOLLAND Kristin M., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 33(3), 2018, pp.379-401.
Publisher:
Sage

Homicide-suicide incidents involving child victims can have a detrimental impact on survivors of the violence, family members and friends of the decedents, and other community members, but the rare occurrence of these acts makes using quantitative data to examine their associated antecedents challenging. Therefore, using qualitative data from the US 2003-2011 National Violent Death Reporting System, the authors examined 175 cases of homicide-suicide involving child victims in an effort to better understand the complex situational factors of these events. The findings indicate that 98 per cent of homicide-suicides with child victims are perpetrated by adults (mostly parents) and propelled by the perpetrators’ intimate partner problems, mental health problems, and criminal/legal problems. These events are often premeditated, and plans for the violence are sometimes disclosed prior to its occurrence. Findings provide support for several theoretical perspectives, and implications for prevention are discussed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Sources and components of stigma experienced by survivors of intimate partner violence

Authors:
MURRAY Christine E., CROWE Allison, OVERSTREET Nichole M.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 33(3), 2018, pp.515-536.
Publisher:
Sage

Previous research suggests that survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) experience stigma, which may affect their willingness to seek help and their recovery process following the end of the abusive relationship. This article presents the Integrated IPV Stigmatization Model, which integrates previous research on the components and sources of the stigma surrounding IPV. Content analysis procedures were used to examine the applicability of the model to qualitative data from an electronic survey with 279 survivors of past abusive relationships. The results demonstrated the most common components and sources of stigma experienced by the participants, as well as the patterns of which components were most common among the various sources of stigma. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

'I get up in the night to cry': the impact of homelessness on higher education students in London, UK

Authors:
MULRENAN Patrick, ATKINS Julia, COX Simon
Journal article citation:
Critical Social Policy, 38(1), 2018, pp.143-154.
Publisher:
Sage

While the higher education landscape has changed radically since the late 1980s, a consistent feature of government policy has been to widen participation to students who were disproportionately excluded previously. Post-1992 universities in particular have experienced a substantial change in their student intake, but challenges remain in ensuring the retention and success of these students. This article argues that student homelessness is a significant and an under-researched barrier to students reaching their potential. The problem is explored here, illuminated by a focus group and a series of interviews involving 16 students from one school at a London post-1992 university. The impact of homelessness was far-reaching in terms of their emotional wellbeing and ability to fully participate in university life, including pressure on time and financial resources, inability to fully focus on studies, and limited engagement with fellow students and the wider university experience. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Trans* policy, politics and research: the UK and Portugal

Authors:
HINES Sally, SANTOS Ana Cristina
Journal article citation:
Critical Social Policy, 38(1), 2018, pp.35-56.
Publisher:
Sage

This article explores law and social policy regarding trans* activism amongst trans* and non-binary social movements, and academic research addressing trans* in the UK and Portugal. In considering different possibilities for theorising gender diversity, this article positions a politics of difference and embodied citizenship as fruitful for synergising the issues under discussion. The authors consider recent law and policy shifts around gender recognition in each country and examine the gaps and the connections between policy developments, activism and research around trans*. Though each country has divergence in terms of the history of trans* activism and research, the article identifies significant similarities in the claims of activist groups in the UK and Portugal and the issues and questions under consideration in academic research on trans* and non-binary. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Where are we now? Twenty-five years of research, policy and practice on young carers

Author:
ALDRIDGE Jo
Journal article citation:
Critical Social Policy, 38(1), 2018, pp.155-165.
Publisher:
Sage

It is more than 25 years since the critical dialogue on young carers was played out in the pages of this journal (see Morris and Keith, 1995; Aldridge and Becker, 1996). Since that time, research evidence has given us a clearer picture of the extent of young caring in the UK and its consequences for children and families, including two new national studies that focus on the prevalence and impact of young caring in England. The introduction of the Care Act, 2014 and the Children and Families Act, 2014 also places new duties on professionals to identify and support young carers and their families. However, this increased focus, not only in policy and practice but also in terms of public awareness, has created a number of dilemmas and challenges for health and social care professionals, whose duty it is to identify and support young carers. These challenges, to a large extent, both mirror and advance issues raised in the original dialogue on young carers in the mid-1990s. They centre on the drive to generate data on the numbers of young carers to support policy directives and service delivery and, some have argued – in the current climate of serious fiscal retrenchment and cuts to youth services – on promoting the needs of one group of vulnerable children and young people over other groups of children in need. This article considers some of these challenges and dilemmas. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Exploring military social work from a social justice perspective

Author:
OLSON Mark D.
Journal article citation:
International Social Work, 61(1), 2018, pp.119-129.
Publisher:
Sage

Calls to enhance military social work content in social work education present unique challenges for a discipline historically associated with social justice and advocacy for peace. The consequences of war demand intervention along multiple psychosocial domains. However, the question remains as to how social workers can address the discrepancies between social work values and military culture. This article argues that the context-bound nature of social work highlights the reciprocal relationship between macro and micro factors intrinsic to military issues. This provides a holistic understanding of the military system and can enhance educational content on military issues to include international perspectives. (Edited publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts