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The effect of recreational activities on falls and aggressive behaviour among residents of a dementia care home

Authors:
JENNINGS-PARKES Mollie, NYMAN Samuel R.
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 27(1), 2017, pp.19-29.
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether existing provision of recreational activities would reduce the incidence of falls and aggressive behaviour. Over a two-month period, residents of a UK dementia care home were provided with recreational activities on some evenings (activity evenings) and no recreational activities on other evenings (control evenings), as per usual care. Activities provided included music sessions, board games, singing, entertainment and light exercise. Anonymised case reports were retrospectively examined by a researcher to compare the incidence of falls and aggressive behaviour on thirty evenings when recreational activities were provided and thirty evenings when recreational activities were not provided. The findings from the research contradicted previous findings and suggested that there was no effect of providing recreational activities on aggressive behaviour but an increase in the incidence of falls. Possible explanations for the contrast in findings could be because the activities were group-based and not specific to the individual needs of residents. A sub-analysis also suggested that falls may only be increased among those that chose not to engage in the activities provided, meaning that additional care is required for those who disengage from group-based activities. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Ageing with a learning disability: self-building peer support to combat loneliness and social isolation

Authors:
POWER Andrew, BARTLETT Ruth
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 26(2), 2016, pp.23-27.
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

This article summarises findings from a small scale study to look at whether peer-advocacy support can help reduce loneliness and social isolation in adults who are ageing with learning disabilities. The context for the study was an increase in the numbers of people with learning disabilities who are more vulnerable to social isolation due to reductions in the provision of day services, both due to cuts in funding and the personalisation agenda. The study was co-designed with two self-advocates with learning disabilities and two professional advocates. A total of 12 interviews with participants in two age groups: 40-55 and 55+ were conducted. The study identified a small range of local peer-support groups around the urban region where the study took place which enabled people to meet other self-advocates who they felt comfortable with. As well as relieving feelings of loneliness and isolation; the groups offered participants the opportunity to learn new skill and participate in the community. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Where does Quality of Life (QoL) fit in the future of technology in the 21st Century?

Authors:
MARSTON Hannah R., FREEMAN Shannon, MUSSELWHITE Charles
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 25(3), 2015, pp.8-14.
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

There is great opportunity to leverage existing technologies to measure Quality of Life (QoL). This article considers the value and use of Quantified Self (QS); also called self/life logging. The QS is a field or movement that enables individuals to incorporate and/or utilise technologies which are wearable. Types of QS may include physical and psychological characteristics such as heart rate and number of steps walked, places visited and tasks completed, dietary choices and number of calories consumed, sleep habits, and self-perceived mood. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

More than just a cup of tea: everyday cultural practices and interactions in research

Author:
ASHWORTH Rosalie
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 24(3), 2014, pp.4-10.
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

In the capacity of her work as a researcher the author visited many people with dementia and their families in their own homes to interview them and discuss their experience of living with dementia. In this reflective account the author discuses the everyday experience of sharing a cup of tea. This practice experience is integrated with literature about cultural practices around tea-drinking. The author argues that incorporating everyday practices such as tea-drinking should become a feature of interactions with research participants, particularly where building relationships is essential in gathering information, such as when interviewing people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

An outline of research by The Debenham Project and its findings

Authors:
MASON Timothy, SLACK Gordon
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 24(1), 2014, pp.15-18.
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

This research project, which took place between July 2012 to August 2013, sought to capture the circumstances, experiences, and perceptions of 42 family carers of people with memory loss and dementia in one rural community in Suffolk. In addition to family carers, 40 volunteers and 12 professionals were also surveyed. The research investigates what encourages families in seeking early diagnosis and early support. Key issues identified were that carers did not feel supported, but felt isolated and that they lacked knowledge about dementia; carers generally turned to family first for help, then to the GP; participants identified the need for services before diagnosis and early help and support were seen as very important. The project was carried out for The Debenham Project, a community-led project which has developed a range of local support services for those supporting people with dementia and those they care for. (Original abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Involving people living with dementia in systematic reviews

Authors:
FISHER Mike, et al
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 24(2), 2014, pp.17-31.
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

This pilot study aimed to undertake the initial stages of a systematic review of the views of people living with dementia, and to explore ways of involving people living with dementia in the review. An initial pragmatic search identified 214 studies on the views of people with dementia. To review the papers seven people were recruited from a local Memory Assessment Service (MAS) who knew they had a diagnosis of dementia. A review group was set up to discuss which studies should be included, which studies were high quality, and whether the researchers had correctly interpreted the key themes. The Dementia Care Mapping tool as used to record the participant's level of engagement and wellbeing in the process. Two trained observers were also incorporated into the group. This pilot study found that it is possible to involve people living with dementia as partners in the review process. Paying careful attention to how material is presented and to group processes the group allowed people to participate and express their views. (Original abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

An audit report on food-related care and dementia written information

Author:
PAPACHRISTOU Ilia
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 24(2), 2014, pp.19-20.
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

This report briefly describes an audit that was developed to find available food-related care and dementia written material. It aimed to address what accessible resources focused on food-related information that helps to inform people with dementia and their caregivers. Written information was collected through visiting, calling and emailing target locations over a period of three months mainly around London and the UK. A total of 13 written materials were found. Five main themes emerged after analysis: changes in appetite, changes in food preparation, methods of eating, eating out and dental care and swallowing difficulties. The authors call for further research to assess the impact written material in the area of food has on people with dementia and their caregivers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Achieving age equality in Welsh health and social care services

Authors:
MORGAN Gareth, et al
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 22(4), October 2012, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

Briefly reports on the findings of a scoping exercise which gathered the views of professionals in 7 Welsh Health Boards, 22 Local Authority and 27 other organisations on their awareness of, and attitudes to, UK government age equality legislation. Questions included whether this would have a direct impact on respondents own job/role; whether the organisations were ready to implement this legislation; barriers to implementation, and whether the legislative framework will have an impact on attitudes and behaviours to ageing.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Phenomenology and the meaning of lived experience: anticipating falling

Authors:
SHAW J.A., CONNELLY D.M., McWILLIAM C.L.
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 22(2), April 2012, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine older adults living independently in the community to explore the meaning of the experience of anticipating falling from a hermeneutic perspective (focusing on interpretation). The findings suggest that maintaining a sense of personal identity is of the utmost importance for older people. Participants in the study found a balance between physical “safety” through efforts to prevent falls and portraying self-image in order to enable themselves to continually strive for quality of life. Service providers need to understand that some risk taking is likely in order to maintain a sense of identity and quality of life. The study aimed to provide insight into the psycho-social considerations that should be considered when delivering fall prevention services to older adults.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Older people, well-being and participation

Authors:
BARNES Marian, WARD Lizzie, GAHAGAN Beatrice
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 22(2), April 2012, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

The University of Brighton and Age Concern, Brighton, Hove and Portslade have been working on participatory research with older people since 2007. Their latest project investigates the experiences of older people in relation to well-being. They have also received ESRC Follow on Funding to apply learning from this project, and from their experiences of working with older people as co-researchers, to develop learning resources for older people's involvement. This article briefly describes what the researchers have learnt from their research into well-being and how the findings will be applied.

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