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Journal article Full text available online for free

Deciding on care options in the digital age

Authors:
ALECXIH Lisa Maria B., BLAKEWAY Carrie
Journal article citation:
Generations, 36(1), 2012, pp.77-82.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

This article discusses how elders and their families need timely and accurate information about HCBS (Home and Community Based Services) programmes in order to have an alternative choice to they may enter nursing homes. It describes how the network of Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC), sponsored by the Administration on Aging and the CMS, attempt to provide such information to elders and their families, as well as to professionals such as case managers and discharge planners who may not be fully aware of HCBS for elders. The article showcases some best practices in providing information about community choices, and ways of assisting elders and their families in decision making. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

HCBS: The next thirty years

Authors:
KANE Robert L., KANE Rosalie A.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 36(1), 2012, pp.131-134.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

This article provides a brief perspective on the progress made over the past thirty years in long-term services and supports, how the paradigm around demand for and use of these services is shifting, and offers a forward-thinking, five-point action plan for putting HCBS(Home and Community Based Services) “front and center,” and moving HCBS into a prominent position as a first choice in long-term supports and services for older adults and people of all ages with disabilities. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

HCBS can keep people with dementia at home

Author:
CHERRY Debra L.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 36(1), 2012, pp.83-90.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Progress towards making HCBS (Home and Community Based Services) a mainstream choice for older adults is challenging when an older person has moderate to severe cognitive impairment. These individuals need a modified continuum of care: one that is dementia-capable. This article discusses approaches that make a difference for people with Alzheimer's Disease and related dementias who want to live at home and in their communities—and for their family members. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Caring for the caregivers: developing models that work

Authors:
BROWDIE Richard, NOELKER Linda
Journal article citation:
Generations, 36(1), 2012, pp.103-106.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

This article describes innovative approaches to family respite for family members of elderly participants in the Ohio HCBS (Home and Community Based Services) waiver programme—individuals who are, by definition, financially and functionally eligible to be served in nursing homes. The article provides an overview of the programme—who it serves and how, and with what results, and also offers case studies of how this programme has made continuing HCBS possible for older adult HCBS waiver clientele. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Can community-based services thrive in a licensed nursing home?

Authors:
JENKENS Robert, THOMAS William H., BARBER Veronica
Journal article citation:
Generations, 36(1), 2012, pp.125-130.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

This article proposes that Green House homes, homes of six to twelve people licensed as nursing facilities that deliver person-directed care through radically redesigned environments and organisational structures, can be part of the home- and community-based spectrum when integrated into residential communities using a scattered-site approach (single or paired homes embedded into residential neighborhoods). In this configuration, Green House homes can provide a community-based option for people with high service and clinical needs who, due to individual circumstances or finances, lack other non-institutional options. The communityintegrated Green House concept is illustrated by two Green House homes operating in a neighborhood in upstate New York. People, both with and without cognitive impairments, who live in the community-integrated Green House homes are expected to remain more integrated into the broader community because of closer physical proximity, more individualised assistance to support participation in external activities, and having a “normalised” home that community members feel comfortable visiting. It is expected that this community integration will improve clinical and satisfaction outcomes, and drive demand and revenue growth. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Transforming inspiration to program application: the journey of transitional keys

Authors:
SHERMAN Andrea, WEINER Marsha
Journal article citation:
Generations, 35(3), 2011, pp.47-51.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Transitional Keys is a multi-disciplinary arts and wellness programme that uses the 'ritual response' to transform times of change and transition into opportunities for growth and opportunities to improve the quality of life for older adults. Based on the work of Barbara Myerhff that is implemented in a variety of care settings for a variety of providers. The authors discuss how to teach about ritual; distinguishing between ritual and ceremony; and demonstrate that ritual is a multidisciplinary art form that can use movement, theatre, writing, poetry, and music.

Journal article Full text available online for free

People do need people: social interaction boosts brain health in older age

Author:
RISTAU Stephen
Journal article citation:
Generations, 35(2), Summer 2011, pp.70-76.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Research shows that people with regular social ties demonstrate significantly less cognitive decline when compared to those who are lonely or isolated. This article provides a critical review of the research on socialisation and risk of dementia. It discusses how aspects of socialization can promote brain health and offers practical lifestyle ideas for increased socialisation. The article identifies traditional forms of socialisation, and discusses social media as a new method for socialization and brain health.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The changing roles of ritual in later life

Authors:
BRILLER Sherylyn, SANKAR Andrea
Journal article citation:
Generations, 35(3), 2011, pp.6-10.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Ritual can give meaning to significant features that characterise contemporary old age, and helps older adults and families face challenges. This introductory article to the Fall 2011 Generations gives an overview of the issue's articles, which show how ritual is important and why it is beneficial for those who work with elders to understand ritual's role in structuring social life throughout the life course. By examining different kinds of ceremonial and daily activities, the article explores how ritual involves repetitive and symbolic actions, patterned behaviour, religious and secular life, and extraordinary and ordinary parts of older adults' lives.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Good for the heart, good for the soul: the creative arts and brain health in later life

Authors:
PATTERSON Michael P., PERLSTEIN Susan
Journal article citation:
Generations, 35(2), Summer 2011, pp.27-36.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

This article reviews the work on creativity in late life and evidence that participation in arts programmes improves cognitive performance. It also explores speculative ideas about the evolution of the creative brain, and how the human brain supports creative activity and certain types of creative challenges that may foster repair and growth of brain structures and their attendant behaviours.

Journal article

The importance of cultural competence in caring for and working in a diverse America

Author:
PARKER Victoria A.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(4), Winter 2010, pp.97-102. Published online only.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

The implications of the increasingly diverse populations of both older people and eldercare providers are discussed in relation to cultural competence. It is argued that interventions to enhance cultural competence can and should be embedded in broader efforts to enhance communication skills both within the workforce and with older service users. The article is written from an American perspective.

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