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Journal article

Effectiveness of brief intervention and case management for children and adolescents with mental health difficulties

Author:
et al
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 79, 2017, pp.362-367.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Objective: To compare the effectiveness of a Brief Intervention (BI) and Treatment As Usual (TAU) in a sample of children and adolescents seeking mental health treatment from a Child and Youth Mental Health Service (CYMHS). BI comprised up to six sessions of psychological therapy from trainee psychologists, and TAU involves case management incorporating assessment and psychological treatment (e.g., individual, parent, family therapy), plus linkage to other services. Method: A matched subjects design was used to evaluate the BI (n = 79) and TAU (n = 79) treatment conditions. Participants were matched according to age, gender, and baseline symptom scores on the Health of the Nations Outcome Scale for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA), which was completed at pre- and post-treatment. The HoNOSCA is a clinician-rated measure of symptoms experienced in the previous two weeks. Results: BI and TAU both significantly reduced mental health symptoms, with no significant difference between treatments overall, on Externalising or Emotional problems subscales, or on the percentage of most problematic items for participants. Conclusions: BI was as effective as TAU in reducing mental health symptoms in some children and adolescents. BI however is briefer, and could form part of a Stepped Care model for CYMHS. Further research is required to establish the most effective elements of BI in reducing mental health symptoms. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Presence redefined: the reciprocal nature of engagement between elder-clowns and persons with dementia

Author:
et al
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 16(1), 2017, pp.46-66.
Publisher:
Sage

Elder-clowns are a recent innovation in arts-based approaches to person-centred dementia care. They use improvisation, humour, and empathy, as well as song, dance, and music. The authors examined elder-clown practice and techniques through a 12-week programme with 23 long-term care residents with moderate to severe dementia in Ontario, Canada. Analysis was based on qualitative interviews and ethnographic observations of video-recorded clown-resident interactions and practice reflections. Findings highlight the reciprocal nature of clown-resident engagement and the capacity of residents to initiate as well as respond to verbal and embodied engagement. Termed relational presence, this was achieved and experienced through affective relationality, reciprocal playfulness, and coconstructed imagination. These results highlight the often overlooked capacity of individuals living with dementia to be deliberately funny, playful, and imaginative. Relational presence offers an important perspective with which to rethink care relationships between individuals living with dementia and long-term care staff. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The dynamics of ageing: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing 2002-15: wave 7

Author:
et al
Editor:
BANKS James
Publisher:
Institute for Fiscal Studies
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
295
Place of publication:
London

This report describes findings from the latest phase of data collection from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a multidisciplinary study of a large representative sample of men and women aged 50 and over living in England, conducted between June 2014 and May 2015. The longitudinal study began in 2002 and the sample is re-examined every two years. In wave 7, information was collected from 9,666 participants in ELSA, including 8,249 ‘core’ participants. The report is structured three chapters, covering: employment and labour market transitions at older ages in England; retirement, well-being, engagement and social status; socio-economic differences in healthy life expectancy and mortality. It also includes a detailed set of tables describing findings in the different domains included in ELSA, including demographics, income, pensions and wealth, social and cultural activity, cognitive function, physical and mental health, and biomarkers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Media reactions to the Panorama programme “Behind Closed Doors: Social Care Exposed” and care staff reflections on publicity of poor practice in the care sector

Author:
et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 18(5), 2016, pp.266-276.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of media reactions to the BBC Television Panorama programme, Behind Closed Doors’ and to set this in the context of interviews with care staff about their reflections on publicity about poor practice in the care sector. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on an analysis of media reactions to recent exposé of abuse in social care in England and data from an interview-based study of care workers. The interviews were analysed to consider the impact of such media reports on staff and to explore their views of action that might be need to be taken about care failings. Findings: There are mixed reactions to exposé of poor care on television and to the debates that precede and follow their broadcast. Debates occur in print and on television, but also in social media. The particular exposé of care home practices by the Panorama programme, Behind Closed Doors, led to debate in England about the potential role of covert cameras in care homes. The interviews revealed that while care staff are affected by scandals in the media about social care, they do not necessarily focus on themes that the media stories subsequently highlight. Overall some are disenchanted while others have ideas of what needs to change to improve practice. Care staff consider that there remain problems in raising concerns about practices and some staff feel unable to stay in workplaces where they have made complaints. Research limitations/implications: The care workers interviewed may not be representative of the sector and they may have wished to provide socially acceptable answers to the researchers. Practice was not observed. Practical implications: Local Safeguarding Adult Boards may wish to develop a communications strategy to deal with requests for reactions to media reports locally and nationally. Safeguarding practitioners may wish to prepare for increased referrals following media coverage of poor care in their areas. They may later be able to use media reports to discuss any local differences of interpretation over matters such as prosecutions for abuse. Trainers and educationalists may wish to clarify the importance given by care providers to raising concerns, the ways in which difficult conversations can be held, and the protections available to whistle-blowers or those raising concerns – with local examples to provide assurance that this is not mere rhetoric. Originality/value: Television reports of problems with social care attract wide media interest but the authors know very little about how care workers respond to depictions of their work and their occupational grouping. This paper links media and expert commentator reactions to television exposé with data acquired from interviews with those on the frontline of care. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Healthy cities: promoting health and equity: evidence for local policy and practice

Author:
et al
Editor:
DE LEEUW Evelyne
Publisher:
World Health Organization
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
vi, 23
Place of publication:
Copenhagen

This publication summarises the evaluation of Phase V (2009–2013) of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network. The evaluation process was designed in collaboration with city representatives, academic institutions and public health experts. It adopted a realist synthesis approach, being responsive to the unique social, cultural, political, health and epidemiological circumstances in the 99 cities in the WHO European Healthy Cities Network and 20 accredited national networks. The evaluation findings are rooted in the enduring healthy city values such as equity, governance, partnership, participation and sustainability. Considering also the core Phase V themes, this publication focuses on policy and governance, healthy urban environments and design, caring and supportive environments, healthy and active living, national network performance and effects on health and equity. The evaluation finds good progress among cities and networks but differing in scale and quality. The study concludes that the healthy cities movement adds value and allows local governments to invest in health and well-being and address inequities through novel approaches to developing health (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Using a collaboratory model to translate social work research Into practice and policy

Author:
et al
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 15(1), January 2005, pp.29-40.
Publisher:
Sage

The purpose of this article was to examine how an initiative of 10 collaborative projects focused on children and youth have applied principles of participatory research, collaboratories, and technological solutions. The study analyzed multiple forms of qualitative data, including semiannual formative evaluations and semistructured interviews of participating partners. Both the collaborative method and the infusion of technology were central to the functioning of collaboratory projects and, ultimately, the translation from research to practice and policy. The community-based participatory nature of the research projects resulted in applicable findings that were credible with people affected by the issues studied. The present study suggests that when there is steadfast commitment on the part of a diverse group of partners, even simple applications of technology can make a difference.

Book

The incest perpetrator: the family member no one wants to treat

Author:
et al
Editor:
HORTON Anne L.
Publisher:
Sage
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
292p., bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Chapters on profiling and identifying the abuser, and outlines a variety of treatment programmes.

Book Full text available online for free

Developing an integration scorecard: a model for understanding and measuring progress towards health and social care integration

Authors:
ROZANSKY Deborah, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
53
Place of publication:
London

The report of a project to identify an overarching framework for what good health and social care integration looks like, and propose a set of metrics for measuring progress towards the government’s ambition of full integration. The work, commissioned by the Department of Health, takes forward earlier research from SCIE about the Integration Standard, and creates a framework for action. The research comprised additional desk and case study-based research and engagement with service users, carers and other stakeholders through interviews and workshops. The logic model developed depicts visually how a fully integrated system might be structured and how it might function. The model has four main components: Enablers of integration, Components of integrated care, Outcomes for people who use services, integrated services and the wider health and care system; and impacts and long-term benefits. Consultation with stakeholders received positive and encouraging feedback about the logic model. The grouping of outcomes into three sets – people’s experience of care, service integration and whole system – also received stakeholder support. The proposed metrics received much more mixed feedback. There is a need to develop metrics to capture the quality or outcomes of integrated services in primary and community settings. The report proposes three sets of recommendations and next steps: to disseminate the integration logic model; carry out further research and testing of the metrics, and for the logic model and metrics to be used as a framework for improvement support and resources. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Learning into Practice Project (LiPP): project report

Authors:
ROSCOE Hannah, et al
Publishers:
Social Care Institute for Excellence, NSPCC
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
89
Place of publication:
London

This report is an internal evaluation of the Learning into Practice Project, aiming to describe the mechanisms developed and tested in the project, what has been learned about each mechanism, and the views of key stakeholders. The goal was to help local safeguarding children boards and SCR reviewers to improve the quality and use of Serious Case Reviews. To that end, four mechanisms were developed and tested: two for improving the quality of SCRs, and two for improving their use. The mechanisms for improving quality included a set of Quality Markers and a series of masterclasses. To improve use of SCRs a mechanism was developed for collating and producing accessible information on practice issues identified in SCRs, resulting in an overview map and range of briefings on inter-professional communication, and an alliance of national strategic and leadership bodies was established to consider and implement improvement work, from a national perspective. The document summarises the main messages from the project, suggesting how the work can be taken forward in the emerging new landscape through: a common framework for commissioning and conducting reviews; an adequately skilled workforce of reviewers; timely access to practical learning from all SCRs; and strategic infrastructure to support improvements in multi-agency safeguarding. Overall learning from the project suggests that to improve the quality and use of SCRs it is crucial to place SCRs in a wider organisational improvement framework and take a ‘whole system’ approach to improving SCRs and their impact (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A calming cushion as a therapeutic wellness tool for youths with disabilities and history of trauma

Authors:
POLAK Reizel, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 62(4), 2017, pp.359-365.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Seclusion and restraint are commonly used by residential staff to control unsafe behaviours of youths with disabilities and complex trauma histories. This pilot study examined the effect of a nonrestraining cushion as a calming device and wellness tool in a setting that prohibits supportive physical contact, to see to what extent the cushion might help these youths to better regulate their emotional distress and unwanted behaviours. Volunteers used the cushion for 15 minutes over 24 sessions. Nine students completed the study and reported reduction in anxiety and agitation, and a soothing feeling with residual effects to their daily routines. This pilot study suggests that the use of a nonrestraining, deep-pressure cushion may simulate a secure holding effect for young people with emotional dysregulation. The cushion is a safe and healing wellness tool that empowers youths and provides programmes with an alternative to seclusion and restraint. (Edited publisher abstract)

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