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Journal article

Disabled people's access to social work education: ways and means of promoting environmental change

Author:
CRAWSHAW Marilyn
Journal article citation:
Social Work Education (The International Journal), 21(5), October 2002, pp.503-514.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Disabled people are under-represented among social workers. It is argued that this results in lack of diversity in the workforce and in reduced opportunities to make service delivery more inclusive. An audit tool is outlined which can be used to identify barriers and strengths at DipSW programme, university site, agency site and individual student level to disabled people entering social work education. Completed audits could then form the basis of DipSW Programme Development Plans or curriculum plans for individual students, as required. Review mechanisms at the different levels would help ensure that attention to planning and action does not get lost. Assessment issues and aspects of the practice teacher/student/tutor relationships are also discussed. Disability equality training is seen as a central component of audit and provision. The need for proactive, not reactive, policies is made clear.

Journal article

The right to know? Assessing genetic origins following donor assisted conception

Author:
CRAWSHAW Marilyn
Journal article citation:
Childright, 160, October 1999, pp.7-8.
Publisher:
Children's Legal Centre

Under the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 donor offspring are forbidden the right of access to identifying information about donors. Looks at the rights of donor offspring in relation to this issue.

Journal article

The 'new family' as an emerging norm: a commentary on the position of social work in assisted reproduction

Authors:
FRONEK Patricia, CRAWSHAW Marilyn
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 45(2), 2015, pp.737-746.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Biomedicine, bioethics and the law dominate policy and practice in controversial methods of creating families through assisted reproductive technologies including cross-border reproductive care and surrogacy. This commentary discusses the ascendancy of ‘the right-to-parent’ lobby in global free markets where individualism, neo-liberal and neo-feminist perspectives, consumerism and porous state borders thrive and legislative frameworks only regulate risky practices well after they are established. It argues the need for social work to be a critical voice in ethical debates, a key contributor to national and international social policy and practice, and a leader in global child welfare matters. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

A qualitative study of the experiences of teenagers and young adults when faced with possible or actual fertility impairment following cancer treatment

Authors:
CRAWSHAW Marilyn, SLOPER Patricia
Publisher:
University of York. Department of Social Policy and Social Work
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
223p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

This study looks in depth at the experiences of young people diagnosed with cancer who find that this may result in their reproductive system becoming damaged. In depth interviews were conducted with thirty eight individuals diagnosed with cancer between ages 13 and 21 and aware of a risk, no matter how small, that their fertility may have been affected. Age at interview ranged from 16 to 30. Recruitment was primarily through three regional paediatric oncology centres in the North of England. There was strong support for being told at diagnosis about the potential impact of treatment on their reproductive system. There was strong support for sperm banking to be offered to all males regardless of their physical or emotional state. Some females would have preferred greater clarity to be offered by doctors about the link between possible interruptions to their menstrual cycle and their reproductive system. Some wanted an explanation at this stage about why egg freezing was not on offer. Overall, coping with the impact of cancer-related fertility concerns was a dynamic process with different aspects arising at different times, in different contexts and in different life stages.

Journal article

From a social issue to policy: social work’s advocacy for the rights of donor conceived people to genetic origins information in the United Kingdom

Authors:
WINCOTT Elizabeth, CRAWSHAW Marilyn
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Health Care, 43(2/3), 2006, pp.53-72.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This paper outlines the 22-year campaign to enable people conceived through donor assisted reproduction techniques to gain the right to information about their origins, focusing on the role of the British Association of Social Workers and Progar, the BASW’s Project Group on Assisted Reproduction, which was founded in 1984. The authors argue that social work values and principles can prove key to identifying structural inequalities that are not necessarily based on socioeconomic disadvantage: their experience of adoption work, for example, enables them to recognise the corrosive effects of secrecy within families and, in the case of assisted conception, to challenge the prevailing legislative and professional culture in this area. The abolition of donor anonymity finally came into force in 2005, although many challenges still remain. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Book Full text available online for free

A qualitative study of the experiences of teenagers and young adults when faced with possible or actual fertility impairment following cancer treatment: research report executive summary

Authors:
CRAWSHAW Marilyn, SLOPER Patricia
Publisher:
University of York. Department of Social Policy and Social Work
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
York

Treatment for cancer can lead to fertility impairment. The effects of this on a young person's emotional and sexual health, identity and well-being, and on their relationships were not known. Neither was it known what effect the experience of coping with potential or actual impairment has on young people as they enter adulthood and were faced with related decisions, including whether and when to have their fertility status tested (where appropriate) and, if they are contemplating parenthood at some stage, whether to opt for assisted conception treatment (where appropriate) or adoption or another route. As growing numbers of young people survive treatment for cancer, and as advances in fertility preservation open up new possibilities for future treatments, it became crucial that more information was gathered about the experiences of patients themselves. The aim of this study was to identify the needs for services that teenagers and young adults had in relation to this aspect of their cancer experience. This will inform staff involved with these patients and those responsible for planning and commissioning cancer services, fertility impairment services and other services as appropriate.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Mind the gap: a case study for changing organisational responses to disabled parents and their families using evidence based practice

Authors:
CRAWSHAW Marilyn, WATES Michele
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 23(2), 2005, pp.111-122.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

This case study describes work carried out by Making Research Count (University of York) project with social services and health agencies to help them develop services for disabled parents. The structure combined the presentation of relevant research findings over one day with follow up consultation and an additional day's structured input after eight weeks to develop goal-focussed implementation strategies. Adult learning theory, systematic organisational theory and practice around management of change and the system for Analysing Verbal Interaction were used. The evaluation suggested that it achieved some success in facilitating research informed implementation strategies. A typology for measuring change is suggested.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Adoption reform: managing diversity and delay

Authors:
BELL Margaret, WILSON Kate, CRAWSHAW Marilyn
Journal article citation:
Adoption and Fostering, 26(3), Autumn 2002, pp.8-18.
Publisher:
British Association for Adoption and Fostering

While many aspects of current government policy on adoption are welcome, there is concern that some key issues in the adoption process are not adequately addressed in the Adoption and Children Bill, 2001, and that the use of quantitative targets will not necessarily support the good practice identified. The authors consider, in particular, two areas of difficulty in the selection and preparation process: managing diversity, and delay. Their study highlights the need for practitioners to be flexible and open in their approach to shared assessments, and for agencies to have robust formal and informal communication systems which are transparent and accountable to users.

Book

Truth and the child 10 years on: information exchange in donor-assisted conception

Authors:
BLYTH Eric, CRAWSHAW Marilyn, SPEIRS Jennifer
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
94p.
Place of publication:
Birmingham

Papers contributing to the debate on donor assisted conception, including the views of donors, mothers, and children. Includes chapters on: an anthropological perspective on kinship and the identity of the child; a sociological perspective on truth and the child; legal issues; children's rights and adult's rights; a genetic perspective; truth and health; child psychiatry and the families of children born following assisted conception; genealogical disadvantages for children from donated gametes; a social worker's view of openness; secrecy and anonymity in donor assisted conception, a view from a family through adoption; truth and the surrogate child; a donor offspring's perspective on secrecy in assisted conception; and issues for donor inseminated offspring.

Journal article

Working at the margins: the views and experiences of court social workers on parental orders work in surrogacy arrangements

Authors:
CRAWSHAW Marilyn, PUREWAL Satvinder, VAN DEN AKKER Olga
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 43(6), 2013, pp.1225-1243.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Unlike many contemporary social work tasks, the work of Parental Order Reporters (PORs) in surrogacy cases in England is infrequent and unresearched. This study offers insights into how experienced social workers approach work in little-regulated but ethically complex contexts outside the mainstream. Sixteen PORs took part in telephone interviews about their experiences in providing court reports on over 135 applications. There was little evidence of controversy about surrogacy, but there were variations in approaches to the task, including that of financial scrutiny. Perceptions of risk arising from genetic difference were thought to be low in light of apparently strong parent–child bonding, commitment of commissioning parents, openness with the child about their origins and awareness of longer-term identity and contact needs. Concern about parents' potential to achieve the latter was limited. However, concerns about the impact on surrogates' children and PORs' constraints of entering the process too late were high. Findings suggest a need for regulation of surrogacy agencies and improved child-focused suitability assessments and preparation of surrogates and commissioning parents, including external scrutiny. More reference to courts over financial aspects and increased use of analytic, research-informed approaches by PORs is also indicated. (Publisher abstract)

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