Filter results

Search results for ‘Author:"hirsch donald"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 3 of 3

Book Full text available online for free

A minimum income standard for the UK in 2017

Authors:
PADLEY Matt, HIRSCH Donald
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
21
Place of publication:
York

This is the 2017 update of the Minimum Income Standard for the United Kingdom, based on what members of the public think people need for an acceptable minimum standard of living. The report shows: the incomes different family types require in 2017 to meet the minimum standard; how the cost of a minimum household budget has changed since the last update in 2016; and how the incomes of people on benefits, and of those working on the National Living Wage, compare to what they need according to MIS. The report states that in 2017, single people needed to earn at least £17,900 a year before tax to achieve MIS, and couples with two children at least £20,400 each. It suggests that despite the increase in the minimum wage for over-25s, working full time on the National Living Wage (NLW), many still fall short of MIS. The report concludes that the freezing of benefits in inflationary times is making low-income families systematically worse off, even where their earnings are being lifted by the NLW. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Households below a Minimum Income Standard: 2008/09 to 2013/14

Authors:
PADLEY Matt, HIRSCH Donald
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
v, 45
Place of publication:
York

This report looks at how many people live in households with insufficient income to afford a minimum socially acceptable standard of living according to the Minimum Income Standard (MIS), a measured rooted in what the public consider is needed for a minimum acceptable standard of living. The paper shows that the proportion of people in households with incomes below MIS increased by a third between 2008/09 and 2013/14, from 21 to nearly 28 per cent, although the rate of increase has slowed. Working families with children have faced a growing risk of low income; 41 per cent of lone parents working full time had incomes below MIS, up from 26 per cent in 2008/09; for families with both parents working full time, the risk rose from 5 to 12 per cent. In couples with a single breadwinner, the risk rose from 38 to 51 per cent. Older singles (over 35) living alone and working full-time have a growing risk of inadequate income: their risk of being below MIS increased from 7 to 14 per cent between 2008/09 and 2013/14. Social tenants became more likely to be below MIS in 2013/14, coinciding with introduction of the under-occupancy charge. For pensioners, the risk of being below MIS rose slightly, but remained far lower than for other groups, at 8.5 per cent. Just over half of individuals with incomes below MIS were in couple families with children (45 per cent in 2008/09). (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Households below a minimum income standard

Authors:
PADLEY Matt, VALADEZ Laura, HIRSCH Donald
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
65
Place of publication:
York

This report examines the changes in the adequacy of incomes, as measured by households' ability to reach the Minimum Income Standard (MIS), between 2008/9 and 2012/13. MIS is a measure based on what the public think is needed for a minimum acceptable standard of living. In addition, the report looks at who is most likely to lack the income needed for an adequate standard of living and analyses the numbers and characteristics of those falling above and below the minimum income standard. Key points include: the proportion of people living in households with an income below MIS increased by nearly a third between 2008/9 and 2012/13; after the 2008 economic downturn, the most severe increase in the percentage unable to afford this minimum acceptable standard of living was initially among single people of working age while since 2010 families with children have seen the greatest increases; pensioners and couples without children remain the most likely to have an adequate income; increased unemployment accounts for 70 per cent of this growth for single households under 35 between 2008/09 and 2012/13; for most working households, however, the increase in numbers below MIS can be explained more by stagnant wages and cuts to in-work benefits than people having less work. (Edited publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to access resource links, advanced search and email alerts