Filter results

Search results for ‘Author:"et al"’ Sort:  

Results 31 - 40 of 29866

Book Full text available online for free

Learning into Practice Project (LiPP): project report

Authors:
ROSCOE Hannah, et al
Publishers:
Social Care Institute for Excellence, NSPCC
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
89
Place of publication:
London

This report is an internal evaluation of the Learning into Practice Project, aiming to describe the mechanisms developed and tested in the project, what has been learned about each mechanism, and the views of key stakeholders. The goal was to help local safeguarding children boards and SCR reviewers to improve the quality and use of Serious Case Reviews. To that end, four mechanisms were developed and tested: two for improving the quality of SCRs, and two for improving their use. The mechanisms for improving quality included a set of Quality Markers and a series of masterclasses. To improve use of SCRs a mechanism was developed for collating and producing accessible information on practice issues identified in SCRs, resulting in an overview map and range of briefings on inter-professional communication, and an alliance of national strategic and leadership bodies was established to consider and implement improvement work, from a national perspective. The document summarises the main messages from the project, suggesting how the work can be taken forward in the emerging new landscape through: a common framework for commissioning and conducting reviews; an adequately skilled workforce of reviewers; timely access to practical learning from all SCRs; and strategic infrastructure to support improvements in multi-agency safeguarding. Overall learning from the project suggests that to improve the quality and use of SCRs it is crucial to place SCRs in a wider organisational improvement framework and take a ‘whole system’ approach to improving SCRs and their impact (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Annual review of local child safeguarding practice reviews

Authors:
DICKENS Jonathan, et al
Publisher:
Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
82
Place of publication:
London

...not to be too surprising to see old approaches still in place, and signs of uncertainty about the new requirements ... experience and understandings of the new system are still evolving, and of course there has been a global pandemic to contend with' (Dickens et al 2021: 49). Having reviewed the LCSPRs from 2021, and having had our focus group discussion with representatives from 22 partnerships, we consider (Edited publisher abstract)

Full text available online for free

Serious case reviews 1998 to 2019: continuities, changes and challenges

Serious case reviews (SCRs) were introduced in the first edition of Working Together, published on the same day as the Cleveland inquiry report in July 1988. Government-commissioned periodic overviews of SCRs have reported on the cases and findings from 1998, with the last one covering cases in 2017-19 (Dickens et al 2022a). The purpose of this report is to give a final overview of the major (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Learning for the future: final analysis of serious case reviews, 2017 to 2019

Authors:
DICKENS Jonathan, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
149
Place of publication:
London

This report is an overview and analysis of 235 cases which led to serious case reviews (SCRs) between April 2017 and September 2019, because children or young people had died or suffered serious harm, and abuse or neglect was known or suspected (and, in the non-fatal cases, there was cause for concern as to the way in which agencies had worked together to safeguard the child). The reports for 166 of those cases were available. The report gives an overview of the key characteristics of the 2017-19 cases, and then addresses three themes in particular: the problem of neglect, the challenges of practice, and the task of listening to the voice of the child. These themes have been chosen because they have been perennial issues throughout the history of SCRs, so there is value in looking at them again now, as the SCR process comes to an end. There is then a chapter that focuses on the issue of intra-familial child sexual abuse, taking it as ‘case study’ that demonstrates so many of the well-established themes in practice. The report concludes by drawing out the messages for the new LCSPR system and highlighting the inescapable challenges and dilemmas of child safeguarding practice. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The economic costs of childhood socio-economic disadvantage in European OECD countries

Authors:
CLARKE Chris, et al
Publisher:
OECD Publishing
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
69
Place of publication:
Paris

Growing up in socio-economic disadvantage has important and long-lasting effects on children' lives. Children from disadvantaged households often fall behind in many areas of well-being and development, with effects that continue to limit their opportunities and outcomes - including their health and labour market outcomes - long after they reach adulthood. Drawing on Europe-wide survey data from 27 countries, this paper explores how childhood socio-economic disadvantage affects later adult labour market and health outcomes, and evaluates the country-level GDP-equivalent cost of childhood disadvantage due to lost employment, lost earnings, and lost health, as well as the costs of lost government revenue and benefit spending. Results point to large costs for societies from childhood socio-economic disadvantage, totalling on average the equivalent of 3.4% of GDP annually. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Understanding the fundamental role of racism in ethnic inequities in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy

Authors:
BECARES Laia, et al
Publishers:
Runnymede Trust, Centre on Dynamics of Ethnicity
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
7
Place of publication:
London

Ethnic inequities in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy have been reported in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Explanations have mainly focused on differences in the level of concern about side effects and in lack of trust in the development and efficacy of vaccines. In this briefing, we propose that racism is the fundamental cause of ethnic inequities in vaccine hesitancy. We discuss how racism at the structural and institutional level has shaped the landscape of risk for the stark ethnic inequities we've seen during the coronavirus pandemic, and in relation to COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. We empirically examine some of the pathways we propose using data from the UK Household Longitudinal Study. Findings show that institutional-level factors (socioeconomic position, area-level deprivation, overcrowding) explained the largest part (42%) of the inequity in vaccine hesitancy for Pakistani or Bangladeshi people, and community-level factors (ethnic density, community cohesion, political efficacy, racism in the area) were the most important factors for Indian and Black groups, explaining 35 per cent and 15 per cent of the inequity, respectively. Our findings suggest that if policy intervened on institutional and community-level factors - shaped by structural and institutional racism - considerable success in reducing ethnic inequities might be achieved. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Thriving Babies: Confident Parents: pilot evaluation

Authors:
TURNPENNY Agnes, et al
Publisher:
What Works for Children's Social Care
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
109
Place of publication:
London

A pilot evaluation of the Thriving Babies: Confident Parents (TBCP) programme, a multiagency partnership of local authority children's services (Early Help and Social Care) and two voluntary sector providers with a national scope: Barnardo's and Home-Start. The Partnership has provided a perinatal support to babies both pre- and post-birth and their (prospective) parents who are recognised as having specific vulnerabilities including: learning difficulties; mental ill health; domestic abuse; substance misuse; social isolation; being in care or a care leaver; or having had a child previously removed from their care. The evaluation suggests that this pilot programme has been well implemented and has started to become consolidated in Manchester. The programme has demonstrated strong evidence of promise in terms of its impact. Key learning from the pilot study regarding the implementation of a model like this includes the importance of: having a clear model with clear aims and desired outcomes; early and sustained messaging and "publicity" about the model across all statutory and partner services (just at the start is not enough); sustained leadership support for implementation beyond a short pilot phase and into "mainstreaming"; having a multi-disciplinary panel as a platform to "receive" referrals, hold multidisciplinary discussions about, and undertake detailed planning in relation to, individual families; highly committed staff who have the capacity to engage effectively with parents in this cohort, to work effectively with children’s social care services as well as a range of partner organisations, and to learn new skills; regular, high-quality supervision for operational staff; regular review and monitoring of outcomes for children and families. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The homelessness monitor: Great Britain 2022

Authors:
WATTS Beth, et al
Publisher:
Crisis
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
xxi, 114
Place of publication:
London

This report was commissioned by Crisis and led by Heriot-Watt University, as part of the Homelessness Monitor series, a longitudinal study providing independent analysis of the homelessness impacts of recent economic and policy developments in Great Britain. The research takes stock of homelessness in 2022 and the five year period before this. It also highlights emerging trends and forecasts some of the likely future changes, identifying the developments likely to have the most significant impacts on homelessness. The report finds that Levels of 'core' (i.e. the most extreme forms of) homelessness are consistently higher in England (0.84% of households in 2020) than in either Wales (0.68% of households in 2020) or Scotland (0.57% of households in 2020). The number of core homeless households are projected to grow further in England, particularly in London, unless policy steps are taken to correct this negative direction of travel. Statistical modelling indicates that the most effective policies for reducing core homelessness include: rehousing quotas for core homeless groups in the social rented sector; increasing the Local Housing Allowance rate; raising the level of Universal Credit payments; expanding Housing First interventions; and maximising the use of prevention tools by local authorities. Such policies in concert could reduce total core homelessness by 34% in England, 30% in Wales, and 42% in Scotland. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Sudden and unexpected deaths in infancy and childhood: National Child Mortality Database Programme thematic report

Authors:
WILLIAMS Tom, et al
Publisher:
National Child Mortality Database
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
64
Place of publication:
Bristol

This analysis focuses on all children in England who died suddenly and unexpectedly after birth and before their 18th birthday in the period 1April 2019 to 31 March 2021. The terms “sudden unexpected death in infancy” (SUDI) for children under 12 months of age, or “sudden unexpected death in childhood” (SUDC) if the child was 12 months of age and older, are used by professionals to refer to this event. The report found that, of all infant and child deaths occurring between April 2019 and March 2021 in England, 30% occurred suddenly and unexpectedly, and of these 64% had no immediately apparent cause. Other key findings relating to sudden and unexpected infant deaths (under 1 year) include: 70% were aged between 28 and 364 days, and 57% were male; infant death rates were higher in urban areas and the most deprived neighbourhoods; for sudden and unexpected infant deaths that occurred during 2020 and had been fully reviewed, 52% were classified as unexplained (ie Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) and 48% went on to be explained by other causes (eg metabolic or cardiac conditions). (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Mental health of children and young people in England 2022: wave 3 follow up to the 2017 survey

Authors:
NEWLOVE-DELGADO T., et al
Publisher:
NHS Digital
Publication year:
2022
Place of publication:
Leeds

This report presents findings from the third (wave 3) in a series of follow up reports to the 2017 Mental Health of Children and Young People (MHCYP) survey, conducted in 2022. The sample includes 2,866 of the children and young people who took part in the MHCYP 2017 survey. The mental health of children and young people aged 7 to 24 years living in England in 2022 is examined, as well as their household circumstances, and their experiences of education, employment and services and of life in their families and communities. Comparisons are made with 2017, 2020 (wave 1) and 2021 (wave 2), where possible, to monitor changes over time. Key findings include: in 2022, 18.0% of children aged 7 to 16 years and 22.0% of young people aged 17 to 24 years had a probable mental disorder; in children aged 7 to 16 years, rates rose from 1 in 9 (12.1%) in 2017 to 1 in 6 (16.7%) in 2020 - rates of probable mental disorder then remained stable between 2020, 2021 and 2022; in young people aged 17 to 19 years, rates of a probable mental disorder rose from 1 in 10 (10.1%) in 2017 to 1 in 6 (17.7%) in 2020 - rates were stable between 2020 and 2021, but then increased from 1 in 6 (17.4%) in 2021 to 1 in 4 (25.7%) in 2022; 11 to 16 year olds with a probable mental disorder were less likely to feel safe at school (61.2%) than those unlikely to have a mental disorder (89.2%) - they were also less likely to report enjoyment of learning or having a friend they could turn to for support; 1 in 8 (12.6%) 11 to 16 year old social media users reported that they had been bullied online - this was more than 1 in 4 (29.4%) among those with a probable mental disorder; 11 to 16 year old social media users with a probable mental disorder were less likely to report feeling safe online (48.4%) than those unlikely to have a disorder (66.5%); 1 in 5 (19.9%) 7 to 16 year olds lived in households that experienced a reduction in household income in the past year - this was more than 1 in 4 (28.6%) among children with a probable mental disorder; among 17 to 22 year olds with a probable mental disorder, 14.8% reported living in a household that had experienced not being able to buy enough food or using a food bank in the past year, compared with 2.1% of young people unlikely to have a mental disorder. (Edited publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to access resource links, advanced search and email alerts