Filter results

Search results for ‘Author:"et al"’ Sort:  

Results 21 - 30 of 29866

webinar recording Full text available online for free

System Transformation Team - Provider collaboratives

Authors:
CUBBON Mark, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
1hr 26mins
Place of publication:
London

This webinar recording presents a panel discussion on: what is a provider collaborative and how they will support the work of an ICS; how provider collaboratives may work alongside systems partners, patients and communities; some first-hand examples of the work and achievements of provider collaboratives. Provider collaboratives are partnership arrangements involving at least two trusts working at scale across multiple places, with a shared purpose and effective decision-making arrangements, to: reduce unwarranted variation and inequalities in health outcomes, access to services and experience; and improve resilience by, for example, providing mutual aid and supporting challenged organisations or fragile services. (Edited publisher abstract)

BookDigital Media Full text available online for free

Developing our understanding of the difference co-production makes in social care

Authors:
WOOD Patrick, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
21
Place of publication:
London

A review of the existing evidence and the experience of people who have been involved in co-production, to understand what more should be done to show the difference that co-production makes. The review considered the impact of co-production on and outcomes for individuals, organisations and communities; in April and May 2022, we facilitated four online sessions with people with lived experience and people who work in services to consider the impact of co-production. Co-production sets out a way of working where professionals and those who draw on services or those who are impacted by a decision work in equal partnership to develop services or make decisions to meet people's needs. Increasingly, the values of co-production are being viewed as a way of developing services or agreeing decisions jointly that are innovative in meeting people's needs. The review identified the benefits of co-production for people with lived experiences, which include self-confidence, self-esteem and sense of empowerment, better health and wellbeing, increased engagement and trust, and higher levels of satisfaction with and awareness of services. It also found benefits for professionals, including improved job satisfaction, motivation and practice, and increased trust, engagement and dialogue with people who draw on care and support and carers. The review found that the health sector had more research available about the impact and outcomes of co-production than the social care sector, which the social care sector can learn from. The report makes a number of recommendations including ensuring evaluation of the impact of co-production in adult social care be undertaken as standard for relevant projects and programmes of work, including focusing on people who are underrepresented in the current evidence base, for example people from Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities and unpaid carers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Principles for No Wrong Door

Authors:
INNOVATION UNIT, et al
Publisher:
Innovation Unit
Publication year:
2021
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

A set of key principles, ‘distinguishers, non-negotiables and provocations’ which all underpin an innovative multidisciplinary staffing team, model and approach to improving work with families and safely reducing the number of children entering care. (Edited publisher abstract)

webinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar and Q&A: Survivor engagement in faith-based organisations

Authors:
BAYLISS Simon, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2020
Pagination:
2 hrs 1 min
Place of publication:
London

This webinar recording focuses on survivor engagement in faith-based organisations. Understanding the needs and experiences of survivors of abuse is crucial for an organisation that is open to learn, welcoming and committed to providing a safe system for all those that are part of it. In light of the recent IICSA (Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse) report, which rightly places real emphasis on the importance of survivor engagement, this is an opportunity to learn more about what makes good survivor engagement and to hear about some experiences and learning of doing this in practice. The webinar covers: the rationale for co-production and survivor engagement; SCIE’s learning on what makes meaningful, strategic survivor engagement; key perspectives on survivor engagement and lessons learnt; reflections and questions. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Webinar recording: Digital innovations in care leavers’ services

Authors:
SMITH Hayley, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2020
Pagination:
58 mins
Place of publication:
London

The COVID-19 crisis has swept away some longstanding barriers to digital working, and demonstrated the benefits and opportunities of this shift, as well as the challenges. For young people leaving care, who may no longer be in direct contact with children’s services, digitally-enabled approaches have huge potential to increase engagement, develop better insight and improve outcomes. This webinar discusses learning and insights from recent digital and data innovations in care leavers’ services, including work to understand outcomes and experiences from the perspective of care leavers. It also dives into Leaving Well, a digital tool developed with six local authorities across the UK that can now be adopted by other councils to support improved care leaver practice. Discussion topics include: care leaver policy and practice landscape – COVID-19, review of the care system; measuring outcomes for care leavers – evidence, gaps, opportunities; digital innovations for care leavers; Leaving Well digital tool – learning and experiences of the early adopters. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Webinar recording: Building back from COVID-19: Involving citizens in the next phase of the pandemic response

Authors:
COOKE Mike, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2020
Place of publication:
London

This webinar discussed ‘dialogue and deliberation’. It focused specifically on engagement by NHS England and Improvement’s London region who have worked in partnership with residents to help shape policy and their response to the pandemic. The webinar focused on why citizen engagement is crucial to COVID-19 recovery and how Integrated Care Systems (ICSs) could benefit from adopting the same approach. This is one of a series of Integrated Care Webinars for 2020/21 – the series offers all 42 Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) and ICSs the opportunity to learn from good practice, connect with other systems and offer practical solutions to issues that systems may be facing as part of their ICS journey and in their response to COVID-19. (Edited publisher abstract)

webinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar: Provider collaboration at scale: what is it, what are the opportunities and how do we get there?

Authors:
BREEN Des, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2021
Place of publication:
London

This webinar explores what we mean by provider collaboration at scale, what the role of a provider collaborative is in helping to join up services across systems and between places. It focuses on the opportunities and challenges of how we make that work during the next phase of ICS development and in response to COVID-19. The webinar shares learning from systems and looks at: examples of mental health and acute provider collaborations at scale, and the opportunities – and challenges – of running these across multiple places; what systems can do to adopt this new way of working, including governance and decision making; how these collaboratives will support ICS development; how to get started. (Edited publisher abstract)

webinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar: The future of place-based partnerships and planning for recovery

Authors:
BURSTOW Paul, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2020
Pagination:
1 hr 1 min
Place of publication:
London

This webinar explores how we build on and strengthen relationships in local places. It looks at how we build cohesive place-based plans for the recovery, resetting and renewal of health and care services. It also looks at the lessons from NHS Confederation and SCIE’s report ‘From place based to place led: a whole place approach to integrating care systems’. There have been many good examples of joint working during the pandemic: GPs working closely with care homes to bring people more seamless and responsive care; successful collaborative working between the NHS and Local Government to make the best use of volunteers; rapid integration of hospital discharge teams to ensure that patients are discharged safely into their homes or residential care. The webinar looks at the future of place and how to galvanise place-based partnerships that support Integrated Care System (ICS) to develop and help plan towards recovery from COVID-19. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Evaluation of the Carers in Employment (CiE) project

Authors:
WILSON Sally, et al
Publisher:
Institute for Employment Studies
Publication year:
2018
Pagination:
45
Place of publication:
Brighton

An independent evaluation of the Carers in Employment (CiE) project, which encouraged nine local authorities to develop local solutions to support carers to remain in or return to work. Support provided by the local authorities included: information, advice and guidance to carers; advice on assistive technology to help carers maintain contact with the cared for person; and employer measures such as raising awareness of the challenges facing employed carers face. Based on the analysis of interviews with 70 carers and 20 employers, the report provides details on the outcomes for both carers and employers. Out of nearly three thousand carers who took part, CiE sites said that they had supported nearly 60 per cent of carers to stay in work. Key findings for carers included: that those carers who received more comprehensive and intensive support were more likely to report benefits; emotional and practical support led to increased morale and reduced social isolation; advocacy and support worker services helped working carers cope better at ‘tipping points’ or times of domestic crises; and that use of assistive technology gave carers peace of mind and helped them to stay in employment. The project also raised employer awareness of the realities facing working carers and helped both carers and employers to improve their awareness of the existing local available help. Involving employers was identified as a key factor in the project’s success. Recommendations for future initiatives are provided. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Developing an integration scorecard: a model for understanding and measuring progress towards health and social care integration

Authors:
ROZANSKY Deborah, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
53
Place of publication:
London

The report of a project to identify an overarching framework for what good health and social care integration looks like, and propose a set of metrics for measuring progress towards the government’s ambition of full integration. The work, commissioned by the Department of Health, takes forward earlier research from SCIE about the Integration Standard, and creates a framework for action. The research comprised additional desk and case study-based research and engagement with service users, carers and other stakeholders through interviews and workshops. The logic model developed depicts visually how a fully integrated system might be structured and how it might function. The model has four main components: Enablers of integration, Components of integrated care, Outcomes for people who use services, integrated services and the wider health and care system; and impacts and long-term benefits. Consultation with stakeholders received positive and encouraging feedback about the logic model. The grouping of outcomes into three sets – people’s experience of care, service integration and whole system – also received stakeholder support. The proposed metrics received much more mixed feedback. There is a need to develop metrics to capture the quality or outcomes of integrated services in primary and community settings. The report proposes three sets of recommendations and next steps: to disseminate the integration logic model; carry out further research and testing of the metrics, and for the logic model and metrics to be used as a framework for improvement support and resources. (Edited publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to access resource links, advanced search and email alerts