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Book Full text available online for free

The dynamics of ageing: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing 2002-15: wave 7

Author:
et al
Editor:
BANKS James
Publisher:
Institute for Fiscal Studies
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
295
Place of publication:
London

This report describes findings from the latest phase of data collection from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a multidisciplinary study of a large representative sample of men and women aged 50 and over living in England, conducted between June 2014 and May 2015. The longitudinal study began in 2002 and the sample is re-examined every two years. In wave 7, information was collected from 9,666 participants in ELSA, including 8,249 ‘core’ participants. The report is structured three chapters, covering: employment and labour market transitions at older ages in England; retirement, well-being, engagement and social status; socio-economic differences in healthy life expectancy and mortality. It also includes a detailed set of tables describing findings in the different domains included in ELSA, including demographics, income, pensions and wealth, social and cultural activity, cognitive function, physical and mental health, and biomarkers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Media reactions to the Panorama programme “Behind Closed Doors: Social Care Exposed” and care staff reflections on publicity of poor practice in the care sector

Author:
et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 18(5), 2016, pp.266-276.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of media reactions to the BBC Television Panorama programme, Behind Closed Doors’ and to set this in the context of interviews with care staff about their reflections on publicity about poor practice in the care sector. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on an analysis of media reactions to recent exposé of abuse in social care in England and data from an interview-based study of care workers. The interviews were analysed to consider the impact of such media reports on staff and to explore their views of action that might be need to be taken about care failings. Findings: There are mixed reactions to exposé of poor care on television and to the debates that precede and follow their broadcast. Debates occur in print and on television, but also in social media. The particular exposé of care home practices by the Panorama programme, Behind Closed Doors, led to debate in England about the potential role of covert cameras in care homes. The interviews revealed that while care staff are affected by scandals in the media about social care, they do not necessarily focus on themes that the media stories subsequently highlight. Overall some are disenchanted while others have ideas of what needs to change to improve practice. Care staff consider that there remain problems in raising concerns about practices and some staff feel unable to stay in workplaces where they have made complaints. Research limitations/implications: The care workers interviewed may not be representative of the sector and they may have wished to provide socially acceptable answers to the researchers. Practice was not observed. Practical implications: Local Safeguarding Adult Boards may wish to develop a communications strategy to deal with requests for reactions to media reports locally and nationally. Safeguarding practitioners may wish to prepare for increased referrals following media coverage of poor care in their areas. They may later be able to use media reports to discuss any local differences of interpretation over matters such as prosecutions for abuse. Trainers and educationalists may wish to clarify the importance given by care providers to raising concerns, the ways in which difficult conversations can be held, and the protections available to whistle-blowers or those raising concerns – with local examples to provide assurance that this is not mere rhetoric. Originality/value: Television reports of problems with social care attract wide media interest but the authors know very little about how care workers respond to depictions of their work and their occupational grouping. This paper links media and expert commentator reactions to television exposé with data acquired from interviews with those on the frontline of care. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Healthy cities: promoting health and equity: evidence for local policy and practice

Author:
et al
Editor:
DE LEEUW Evelyne
Publisher:
World Health Organization
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
vi, 23
Place of publication:
Copenhagen

This publication summarises the evaluation of Phase V (2009–2013) of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network. The evaluation process was designed in collaboration with city representatives, academic institutions and public health experts. It adopted a realist synthesis approach, being responsive to the unique social, cultural, political, health and epidemiological circumstances in the 99 cities in the WHO European Healthy Cities Network and 20 accredited national networks. The evaluation findings are rooted in the enduring healthy city values such as equity, governance, partnership, participation and sustainability. Considering also the core Phase V themes, this publication focuses on policy and governance, healthy urban environments and design, caring and supportive environments, healthy and active living, national network performance and effects on health and equity. The evaluation finds good progress among cities and networks but differing in scale and quality. The study concludes that the healthy cities movement adds value and allows local governments to invest in health and well-being and address inequities through novel approaches to developing health (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Using a collaboratory model to translate social work research Into practice and policy

Author:
et al
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 15(1), January 2005, pp.29-40.
Publisher:
Sage

The purpose of this article was to examine how an initiative of 10 collaborative projects focused on children and youth have applied principles of participatory research, collaboratories, and technological solutions. The study analyzed multiple forms of qualitative data, including semiannual formative evaluations and semistructured interviews of participating partners. Both the collaborative method and the infusion of technology were central to the functioning of collaboratory projects and, ultimately, the translation from research to practice and policy. The community-based participatory nature of the research projects resulted in applicable findings that were credible with people affected by the issues studied. The present study suggests that when there is steadfast commitment on the part of a diverse group of partners, even simple applications of technology can make a difference.

Book

The incest perpetrator: the family member no one wants to treat

Author:
et al
Editor:
HORTON Anne L.
Publisher:
Sage
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
292p., bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Chapters on profiling and identifying the abuser, and outlines a variety of treatment programmes.

webinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar: Future options for housing and care

Authors:
BURSTOW Paul, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2021
Pagination:
1 hr
Place of publication:
London

This webinar was recorded as part of the launch of the Commission's earlier discussion paper 'Future options for housing and care'. The discussion paper and webinar shaped the remaining activities of the Commission and the final report published in November 2021 'A place we can call home: A vision and a roadmap for providing more options for housing with care and support for older people’. The webinar recording shares the initial findings from the work of the Commission presented in the Discussion Paper; shares examples of emerging good practice; shares the findings from the population survey and explore their implications; explores ideas on how we coproduce better local plans for housing that supports people's care; discusses the questions posed in the Discussion paper with a view to shaping the next phase of the Commission's work. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Mediawebinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar: The benefits, capabilities and governance of Provider Collaboratives

Authors:
GRACE Julia, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2021
Pagination:
1 hr 1 min
Place of publication:
London

This webinar explores the benefits, capabilities and governance of Provider Collaboratives and their role in systems - and in particular their relationships with place. This webinar series is taking a deep dive into everything you need to know about Integrated Care System (ICS) development, taking a closer look at the information, guidance and tools being prepared for publication as part of the NHS England and NHS Improvement ICS Implementation Programme and sharing good practice and learning from across the country. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Mediawebinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar: Leading in partnership - Leadership and strengths-based practice

Authors:
McPARLAND Anthony, et al
Publication year:
2021
Pagination:
1 hr
Place of publication:
London

Leadership is a critical aspect of strengths-based practice. Without effective and committed leaders, strengths-based practices are unlikely to flourish. Whilst a lot of attention in recent years has focused on key elements of practice, such as strengths-based conversations, assessments and care planning, and the processes which underpin them, less attention had been given to leadership of strengths-based practice; what it looks like; how it differs from other models of leadership and how you do it well. This webinar explores: Key features of leadership and strengths-based practice; How you lead the introduction of strengths-based practice in a different climate? How you co-produce with people who draw on support? How do you lead across partnerships? How do you lead teams? The webinar recording also covers the Strengths-Based practice leadership programme, a programme from the Social Care Institute for Excellence and the University of Birmingham, which is designed to support practice leaders to demonstrate leadership through engaging with academic insights, critically reflecting on their own leadership, and developing a community of practice with their peers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Mediawebinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar: Voluntary sector partnerships and Integrated Care Systems

Authors:
TESTER Neil, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2021
Pagination:
1hr 31 mins
Place of publication:
London

This webinar explores the importance of the voluntary, community and social enterprise VCSE sector contribution in shaping, improving and delivering services, and developing and implementing plans to tackle the wider determinants of health. It looks at how to effectively include this diverse and creative sector in emergent ICB structures and models. The webinar shares learning from systems, and asks: How Integrated Care Boards ICBs can engage and embed the VCSE sector in system level governance and decision making arrangements; How to build on the involvement of VCSE partners in forums at place and neighbourhood level; How to ensure the VCSE sector can be supported to remain resilient and effective as part of a wider system. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Mediawebinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar: Leading strengths-based practice - New insights and learning

Authors:
KING Ewan, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2022
Pagination:
50 mins
Place of publication:
London

This webinar explores the role of leaders of strengths-based approaches to care and support; and lessons from the Birmingham University and SCIE Leadership of Strengths Based Practice Programme. It explores key themes like: developing compelling visions and plans for change; leading in collaboration; modelling strengths based practice; and leading effective and supportive teams and developing supportive systems for strengths based practice. (Edited publisher abstract)

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