Safeguarding adults: a national framework of standards for good practice in adult protection work

Author:
ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF SOCIAL SERVICES
Publisher:
Association of Directors of Social Services
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
60p.
Place of publication:
London

The document follows on from the March 2000 DoH guidance No Secrets which set out a framework for the development of adult protection work. It argues that work in this area must concentrate on ensuring that services are overseen by local Safeguarding Adults Committees so that all citizens can be free from 'violence, harassment, humiliation and degradation.' Members of the committee should be sufficiently senior in their organisations to represent that organisation effectively, to make multi-agency agreements, and to help ensure that sufficient resources are available to meet all the objectives to be found in its forward plan. Each organisation should designate a champion for the implementation of this work and a representative on the local Safeguarding Adults partnership, with clear lines of accountability and feedback for this aspect of their work within their organisation. There should be a clear statement of zero tolerance of abuse and neglect - a message which should be actively promoted to the public. Zero tolerance should be underpinned by clear procedures that cover incidents of violence towards any person. There should be a clear policy and procedure for reporting all suspected crimes taking place within services to the police. So far as training is concerned, the framework says it is the responsibility of each organisation to ensure that it has a workforce development plan that includes competencies of staff and volunteers in relation to Safeguarding Adults work. Staff will need different competencies depending on whether they are frontline staff or risk-managers. The framework of standards also cover organisational responses to abuse and neglect, coping with issues such as mental incapacity, as well as upholding individual citizens' human rights.

Extended abstract:
Author

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF SOCIAL SERVICES.

Title

Safeguarding adults: a national framework of standards for good practice in adult protection work.

Publisher

Association of Directors of Social Services, 2005

Summary

This document argues that work in this area must concentrate on ensuring that services are overseen by local Safeguarding Adults Committees so that all citizens can be free from 'violence, harassment, humiliation and degradation.' Members of the committee should be sufficiently senior in their organisations to represent that organisation effectively, to make multi-agency agreements, and to help ensure that sufficient resources are available to meet all the objectives to be found in its forward plan. Each organisation should designate a champion for the implementation of this work and a representative on the local Safeguarding Adults partnership, with clear lines of accountability and feedback for this aspect of their work within their organisation. There should be a clear statement of zero tolerance of abuse and neglect - a message which should be actively promoted to the public. Zero tolerance should be underpinned by clear procedures that cover incidents of violence towards any person. There should be a clear policy and procedure for reporting all suspected crimes taking place within services to the police. So far as training is concerned, the framework says it is the responsibility of each organisation to ensure that it has a workforce development plan that includes competencies of staff and volunteers in relation to Safeguarding Adults work. Staff will need different competencies depending on whether they are frontline staff or risk-managers. The framework of standards also cover organisational responses to abuse and neglect, coping with issues such as mental incapacity, as well as upholding individual citizens' human rights.

Context

This document follows on from the March 2000 DH guidance No Secrets which set out a framework for the development of adult protection work.

Contents

An introduction and executive summary are followed by information on context and definitions: a duty to safeguard adults and the need for ‘Safeguarding Adults' work. The first section, on j oint planning and capability, gives Standard 1, The Partnership, and Standard 2, Partner organisations. The next, on p revention of abuse and neglect, gives Standard 3, In the community, Standard 4, Within service delivery, and Standard 5, Training standards. The third section, on r esponding to abuse and neglect, gives Standard 6, Upholding human rights, Standard 7, Joint systems, Standard 8, Partner agency systems, and Standard 9, Effective procedures, ending with case examples. The final section, on a ccess and involvement, gives Standard 10, Equal access to safeguarding services, and Standard 11, Engaging citizens. Relevant legal statutes, a glossary, references and relevant publications, and useful websites end the publication. The ‘Headline standards' are as follows: Standard 1: Each local authority has established a multi-agency partnership to lead ‘Safeguarding Adults' work. Standard 2: Accountability for and ownership of ‘Safeguarding Adults' work is recognised by each partner organisation's executive body. Standard 3: The ‘Safeguarding Adults' policy includes a clear statement of every person's right to live a life free from abuse and neglect, and this message is actively promoted to the public by the Local Strategic Partnership, the ‘Safeguarding Adults' partnership, and its member organisations. Standard 4: Each partner agency has a clear, well-publicised policy of zero tolerance of abuse within the organisation. Standard 5: The ‘Safeguarding Adults' partnership oversees a multi-agency workforce development/training sub-group. The partnership has a workforce development/training strategy and ensures that it is appropriately resourced. Standard 6: All citizens can access information about how to gain safety from abuse and violence, including information about the local ‘Safeguarding Adults' procedures. Standard 7: There is a local multi-agency ‘Safeguarding Adults' policy and procedure describing the framework for responding to all adults ‘ who is or may be eligible for community care services' and who may be at risk of abuse or neglect. Standard 8: Each partner agency has a set of internal guidelines, consistent with the local multi-agency ‘Safeguarding Adults' policy and procedures, which set out the responsibilities of all workers to operate within it. Standard 9: The multi-agency ‘Safeguarding Adults' procedures detail the following stages:

Alert, Referral, Decision, Safeguarding assessment strategy, Safeguarding assessment, Safeguarding plan, Review, Recording and Monitoring.

Standard 10: The safeguarding procedures are accessible to all adults covered by the policy. Standard 11: The partnership explicitly includes service users as key partners in all aspects of the work. This includes building service-user participation into its: membership; monitoring, development and implementation of its work; training strategy; and planning and implementation of their individual safeguarding assessment and plans.

99 references

Subject terms:
standards, vulnerable adults, adult abuse, safeguarding adults;
Content types:
practice guidance, standards
Location(s):
United Kingdom
Links:
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