Growing together: a practice guide to promoting social inclusion through gardening and horticulture

Authors:
SEMPIK Joe, ALDRIDGE Jo, BECKER Saul
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
66p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

The aim of the project was to identify and assess the effectiveness, benefits and limitations of horticulture and gardening as a tool for promoting social inclusion, health and well-being for vulnerable people (including those with learning difficulties, physical disabilities, mental health problems, older people, ethnic minorities and people living in disadvantaged communities). The project provided information and guidance for the development of horticultural and gardening schemes which aim to promote social inclusion and well-being.  The research also contributed to greater awareness and understanding of the circumstances, experiences and needs of socially excluded people and how gardening can contribute to their social inclusion.  The project included dissemination and training strategies aimed at raising awareness of all these issues among public, social and health care professionals and service users. The research discovered that there are nearly 1,000 therapeutic horticulture projects in the UK working with 22,000 clients each week.  This shows that there are 1,000,000 client placements a  year.

Extended abstract:
Author

SEMPIK Joe, ALDRIDGE Jo, BECKER Saul.

Title

Growing together: a practice guide to promoting social inclusion through gardening and horticulture.

Publisher

Policy Press, 2005

Summary

The aim of this project was to identify and assess the effectiveness, benefits and limitations of horticulture and gardening as a tool for promoting social inclusion, health and well-being for vulnerable people (including those with learning difficulties, physical disabilities, mental health problems, older people, ethnic minorities and people living in disadvantaged communities).

Context

The calming and restorative powers of plants and of nature are increasingly valued as a means of helping people escape from the pressure and competition of our technology-driven world.

Contents

An introduction explains that the purpose of the guide is to highlight issues of social inclusion among practitioners of social and therapeutic horticulture (STH) and to illustrate ways in which horticulture and gardening projects can promote it. It also looks at issues such as the effective management of STH projects for a range of vulnerable groups, but it is not intended as a prescriptive guide or a code of conduct. The Growing Together research programme is described and future research welcomed. Chapters then discuss activities and opportunities, managing the project, and communication, concluding that, while not intended as a step-by-step manual, as a number of guidance documents already exist, it is hoped it will service as a useful guide. The project provided information and guidance for the development of horticultural and gardening schemes which aim to promote social inclusion and well-being. The research also contributed to greater awareness and understanding of the circumstances, experiences and needs of socially excluded people and how gardening can contribute to their social inclusion. The project included dissemination and training strategies aimed at raising awareness of all these issues among public, social and health care professionals and service users. The research discovered that there are nearly 1,000 therapeutic horticulture projects in the UK working with 22,000 clients each week. This shows that there are 1,000,000 client placements a year. Appendices include a checklist for anyone considering starting a new project, textbooks and useful publications, contact details of useful organisations, risk assessment, and Criminal Records Bureau disclosure certificates.

12 reference

Subject terms:
leisure activities, service users, social inclusion, therapeutic horticulture, therapies, therapy and treatment, environment;
Content types:
practice guidance, research
Location(s):
United Kingdom
Link:
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ISBN print:
1 86134 726 X

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