Dementia 2010: the economic burden of dementia and associated research funding in the United Kingdom

Authors:
LUENGO-FERNANDEZ Ramon, LEAL Jose, GRAY Alastair
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Research Trust
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
35p.
Place of publication:
Cambridge

The Alzheimer’s Research Trust commissioned this study to calculate the costs of dementia in terms of health services, social services, unpaid carers, premature mortality and absence from work. This cost was compared with those for other medical challenges of the age: cancer, heart disease and stroke. Current levels of research funding were also compared. The number of patients with dementia in the UK in 2008 was estimate to be 821,884; 1.3% of the UK population. The overall societal cost of dementia was £23 billion including health and social care, informal care and lost productivity (£27,647 per person per year).This compares to societal costs of £12 billion for cancer, £8 billion for CHD and £5 billion for stroke. It is estimated that 37% of all dementia patients are in long term care institutions costing in excess of £9 billion per year in social care. Health care costs are put at £1.2 billion; hospital inpatient stays account for 44% of the total. The 1.5 billion hours of unpaid care was valued at £12 billion and productivity losses at £29 million.  Government and charitable spending on dementia research is 12 times lower than that on cancer: £50 million compared to £590 million. The study concludes that research spending on dementia and stroke is severely underfunded compared to cancer and CHD.

Subject terms:
social care provision, carers, charities, care homes, costs, dementia, financing, health care, government policy;
Content type:
research
Location(s):
United Kingdom

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to access resource links, advanced search and email alerts