Can we live with how we're dying? Advancing the case for free social care at the end of life

Author:
MACMILLAN CANCER SUPPORT
Publisher:
Macmillan Cancer Support
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
24
Place of publication:
London

The government has made some progress in assessing the feasibility of free social care at the end of life since the policy was formally recommended by the Palliative Care Funding Review in 2011. However, the lack of an economic assessment has been the major stumbling block to a final decision being made. In response, this report provides an assessment of the views of senior health and social care decision makers about the economic case for free social care at the end of life. It draws from three pieces of research around free social care at the end of life, including a poll of 101 senior health and social care decision makers, in-depth interviews with ten senior health and social care decision makers, and a second poll of a range of different health professionals. The study also included an evidence review of the costs associated with not providing choice at the end of life and what providing free social care at end of life could actually save. In setting out the economic case this report is also designed to complement the recently published OPM report ‘How could free social care work in practice?’ Together, the two reports provide the ‘why’ and ‘how’ in the case for making free social care at the end of life a reality as soon as possible. (Edited publisher abstract)

Subject terms:
end of life care, social care provision, dying, access to services, palliative care, community care, home help, economic evaluation, financing, resource allocation, cost effectiveness;
Content type:
research
Location(s):
England
Link:
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