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Book Full text available online for free

Mental health considerations during COVID-19 outbreak

Author:
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
Publisher:
World Health Organization
Publication year:
2020
Pagination:
5
Place of publication:
Geneva

Advice from the World Health Organisation on the considerations people should take to combat stress and support their mental and psychological well-being during coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak. The advice covers considerations for the general population, health professionals and care workers, team leaders and managers, those caring for children or older people, and for people living in self (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Supporting mental health during Covid-19: a brief guide

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2020
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

...to maintain their wellbeing during the COVID-19 outbreak. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Reducing social worker burnout during COVID-19

Authors:
PEINADO Micaela, ANDERSON Kelly N.
Journal article citation:
International Social Work, 63(6), 2020, pp.757-760.
Publisher:
Sage

Burnout has become part of everyday vocabulary. During the time of COVID-19, burnout is no longer exclusively associated with job-related stress. Our current climate is entrenched with unprecedented levels of varying societal stressors. Particularly during this time, social workers should prioritize their own mental health. This is necessary in order to have continued success when working... (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Challenging behavior of nursing home residents during COVID-19 measures in the Netherlands

Authors:
LEONTJEVAS Ruslan, et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, early cite 9 December 2020,
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Objectives: From the perspective of the nursing home (NH) practitioners, to gain understanding of (1) whether challenging behavior in NH residents changed during the COVID-19 measures, (2) whether the practitioners’ involvement in the treatment of challenging behavior changed, (3) what can be learned from the experience of NH staff. Methods: A mixed methods study with a survey in 323 NH... (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Supporting the emotional wellbeing of adults in child care settings during the COVID-19

Authors:
QUIN Shona, NOEL Pen
Journal article citation:
Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care, 19(3), 2020, Online only
Publisher:
Department of Social Work. University of Strathclyde.

In order to provide an emotionally responsive environment for young people in care, we must turn our attention to the emotional wellbeing of the adults who look after them. The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity to highlight the importance of the emotional wellbeing of caring adults. This includes introducing processes within the workplace that can be adopted to support the development (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Caring and COVID-19: hunger and mental wellbeing

Authors:
BENNETT Matthew R., ZHANG Yanan, YEANDLE Sue
Publisher:
University of Sheffield. CIRCLE
Publication year:
2020
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
Sheffield

This report looks at the use of foodbanks and the experience of hunger in the households of unpaid carers providing care to someone living outside their own household in April 2020, during COVID-19 lockdown. Drawing on data from the April 2020 wave of Understanding Society COVID-19 survey, the analysis also reports evidence of changes in carers’ mental wellbeing, analysing these by sex, age... (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and psychosocial considerations during COVID-19 outbreak

Author:
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
Publisher:
World Health Organization
Publication year:
2020
Pagination:
6
Place of publication:
Geneva

Summarises key messages that can be used in communications to support the mental and psychosocial well-being of different groups during coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. It includes messages for health care workers, health care managers, care providers of children, older adults, people with underlying health conditions, and people in isolation. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Mediawebinar recording Full text available online for free

Webinar recording: Remote assessments during the COVID-19 crisis

Author:
NATIONAL MENTAL CAPACITY FORUM
Publisher:
National Mental Capacity Forum
Publication year:
2020
Place of publication:
London

In this webinar Alex Ruck Keene, Lorraine Currie and Chelle Farnan from the National Mental Capacity discuss how the law works in terms of remote assessment and the practicalities during COVID-19. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Stress‐buffering role of social support during COVID19

Authors:
SZKODY Erica, et al
Journal article citation:
Family Process, early cite 21 November 2020,
Publisher:
Wiley

In order to reduce the high infection rate of COVID19, individuals began to engage in self‐isolation amid a time of uncertainty and worry. Given that social support can be protective against the negative effects of distress on mental and physical health, the lack of support may negatively impact individuals during their self‐isolation. Thus, the current study examined the role of self‐isolation... (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Stress and parenting during the global COVID-19 pandemic

Authors:
BROWN Samantha M., et al
Journal article citation:
Child Abuse and Neglect, 110(2), 2020, p.104699.
Publisher:
Elsevier

...potential. Conversely, greater parental support and perceived control during the pandemic are associated with lower perceived stress and child abuse potential. Results also indicate racial and ethnic differences in COVID-19 related stressors, but not in mental health risk, protective factors, perceived stress, or child abuse potential. Conclusion: Findings suggest that although families experience (Edited publisher abstract)

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